STD stats continue to spike – and with deadly consequences

The Chapman Student Health center offers free condoms to help students make safer sex choices. Photo courtesy of Karina Cardenas.

Despite a stunning rise in sexually transmitted diseases, many Chapman students are not taking the necessary precautions to prevent them.

The California Department of Public Health announced this year that the state was grappling with a roaring STD epidemic, with people less than 25 years old contracting 54 percent of all new chlamydia infections and 33 percent of all new gonorrhea cases. Syphilis had skyrocketed, with a 600 percent jump in the number of women diagnosed with the disease between 2012 and 2017.

One in four adolescent females has an STD, such as chlamydia or human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes genital warts, and, in some cases, various cancers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Yet, most Chapman students discount their risk.

“I usually wear condoms. Sometimes in the spur of the moment, I forget,” said J.L, a senior business major, who asked that only his initials be used for privacy reasons. “I haven’t gotten tested since last year.”

“I’ve honestly never gotten an STD check,” said Lieu Madayag, a sophomore political science major, Madayag said this is because she has only had sex with one person, whom she trusts and has been with for two years.

A., a senior psychology major with HPV, said she has no idea how she contracted the virus.

One in four adolescent females has an STD, such as chlamydia or human papillomavirus (HPV), the virus that causes genital warts, and, in some cases, various cancers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Photo courtesy of Karina Cardenas.

“[I didn’t always use a condom] my sophomore year, which now haunts me because I have to take medicine still to this day, two years later,” said A, who prefers to go by her first initial for privacy reasons. While HPV is usually burned or frozen off, A said she uses a gel for whenever her genital warts reappear.

While men also face risks, women have the potential to wind up with pelvic inflammatory disease, fertility problems, and may even be at a higher risk of ectopic pregnancy, according to the CDC.

Their children may also face risks.

Last year, there were 283 congenital syphilis cases, including 30 stillbirths, in California, an increase of 32 percent over 2016, according to the CDPH.

Chapman Health Center Director Jacqueline Deats estimates the Center receives about 600 inquiries a year about STD screenings. She declined to release statistics concerning test results.

Each student following up with an examination will shell out roughly $50 for the test, but the price may rise, depending on the type and number of tests administered.

The Health Center offers a four-panel screening for gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, and HIV. Once a student receives a positive diagnosis, the process is far less cut and dried.

The health center will offer medication and services for less serious infections, but more serious cases are referred to specialists or third-party practices, Deats explained.

New mutated strains of gonorrhea, resistant to antibiotics or mainstream medications, are a special concern, as they can prove deadly, noted Deats.  

Yet, some students continue to see STDs as no big deal.

“I make sure who I sleep with is clean, I ask them and trust them. If I got an STD, I’d be fine, it’s not the end of the world [because] there is medicine,” said Adam, a senior broadcast major, who prefers to go by his first name only.

A 2016 study revealed 42 percent of 3,953 adolescents and young adults who had sex and did not get tested assumed they were not at risk for an infection according to the Journal of Adolescent Health.  

Dani Smith, Director of P.E.E.R. (Proactive Education Encouraging Responsibility) and Health Education at Chapman, said a feeling of invincibility is common in young people.

“This feeling or thought that nothing will happen to them,  or that they are somehow immune, is one of the reasons why college students engage in high-risk behaviors,” Smith said.

A. found out the hard way she was not invincible.

I know HPV doesn’t define me as a person,” she acknowledged, “but it completely destroyed me.”

Chapman students questioning consumerism

Old is gold for Chapman students like Natalia Ventura, sophomore peace studies major, who prefers plucking used clothes from thrift stores to raiding the racks of Urban Outfitters, Forever 21, and H&M for the latest fashion trends. Ventura says she is helping the planet while saving money.

IMG_1306.JPG

Valentina Pagliari lounging with an impressive collection of her thrifted clothing. Photo by Torian Mylott.

Sustainable shopping is consuming consciously: only buying what you need in ways that minimize one’s carbon footprint, and supporting businesses that treat and pay employees well. While sustainable shopping may involve paying premium prices to designers and companies that go to great lengths to make sure their workers are well paid, it can also involve buying on the secondary market – thrifting, in other words – and that saves money. Some also swap clothes, loan each other needed items, or raid their parents’ closets for retro items.

Shopping sustainably is “overall a greener and more ethical choice,”  says junior film studies major Kamla Thurtle. Kamla likes to shop for thrifted clothing at Buffalo Exchange, Deelux, and Goodwill.

SS Article pic.jpg

Ventura rocking some thrifted patterned pants. Photo courtesy of Natalia Ventura.

Many students are taking their passion for sustainable shopping further, like Ventura and Valentina Pagliari, a junior film studies major, who are starting a new club together called “Chapman Thrifties.” This group will be “a platform for Chapman students to come together and talk about sustainability, for them to become aware of where their clothes are coming from, and to instill more sustainable fashion practices into our students,” says Pagliari. The goal is to create more of a dialogue about clothing and “an awareness about how much our clothes affect the rest of the world,” says Ventura. Some of Ventura’s  favorite ways to sustainably shop are through hand-me-downs, upcycling, trading with friends, and thrifting at places like Casa Teresa.

IMG_1332.JPG

Pagliari posing with a vintage purse she purchased at The Orange Antique Mall. Photo by Torian Mylott.

Sustainability has even come to online shopping.

Pagliari created an Instagram page supporting and connecting thrifting enthusiasts through Depop, an online selling platform where anyone can sell or buy clothes. Pagliari’s passion for thrifting and vintage clothing began in high school where she saw other students “curate their own outfits, instead of copying and pasting an outfit from a mannequin,” she said. Pagliari has been adding her own creativity to her wardrobe ever since. She prefers second-hand shopping to buying new, because she wants her style – which she describes as “rock-n-roll chick  from the 70s that had a baby with a 90s hip-hop tomboy queen” – to be unique. Pagliari said she almost always profits from selling her own clothes. “If something is worth money, why not get money for it?” she said.

Inspired to go thrifting? Here are a few options of cheap sustainable shopping in Orange:

Goodwill 849 S. Tustin St. Monday – Saturday 9 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Sunday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Deelux 132 S. Glassell St. Monday – Saturday 11 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Sunday 12 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Assistance League 124 S. Orange St Tuesday – Friday 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Salvation Army 180 S. Tustin St. Monday – Saturday 9 a.m. – 9 p.m.
Casa Teresa 234 N. Glassell St Friday-Sunday & Wednesday – 11 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Thursday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Orange Antique Mall 118 S. Glassell St. Every day 10 a.m. – 5:45 p.m.

The 10 Stages of Parking at Chapman

Stage 1: “How did I get to campus so fast? Maybe I will have enough time to get Starbucks before class.”

Stage 2: “Oh there’s a spot… UGH stupid motorcycle!”

Stage 3: “They would add 20 reserved spots for guests….technically I am a guest right?”

 

Stage 4: “WHY do people think it is okay to drive 80 mph in a parking garage?!”

 

Stage 5: “Yes please, walk slower. I don’t have to get to class or anything.”

 

Stage 6: “YES I found one” *someone steals it*

 

Stage 7: “I’ll just wait here and stalk someone walking to their car”

 

Stage 8: “I’ve been driving in circles for 20 minutes”

 

Stage 9: “Screw it I am parking illegally”

Stage 10: “I give up, I am parking in Dodge/Narnia and walking”

 

Schools Out, Pets Out: Students are dumping their pets at the end of the semester.

Students vacating campus for the summer are leaving behind more than just their school work.

Chester, an abandoned Pit bull, has been at OC Animal Care since April.

When the school year is over, students returning home or moving after graduation often find themselves stuck on what to do with their animals. While some find new owners for their pets, others are depositing them at animal shelters or even dumping them on the streets.

According to Brittany Hayes, the director of OC Animal Care’s community outreach program, there is a correlation between the time students leave school in May and the number of shelter intakes in college towns.  

In May 2017, there were 1,653 intakes compared to 896 intakes in November 2017.  But that increase may not be entirely due to students leaving: Spring is also the peak mating season for cats, leading to an increase in stray kittens, said OC Animal Care field worker Amy Hernandez.

Nonetheless, there are students who find themselves unable to take the pets they brought with them to Chapman or took in while here to their next destination.

Chapman alumna Dana Lujack took responsibility for finding a home for her friend’s cat, Captain after he was abandoned in Orange over the summer while his owner went home to Portola Valley.

“It’s always a risk taking an animal to the shelter,” Lujack said. “But I didn’t have another option, he was just bouncing around the neighborhood.”

Lujack said she didn’t want to take the cat to Orange County Animal Shelter because it’s a kill shelter and costs money to surrender a pet. In 2017, there were 3,594 shelter euthanasias according to OC Animal Care’s statistics.

Even when students try to hand off their pets to shelters, they encounter obstacles involving animal health, residency, expenses and refusal for other reasons.

When Lujack couldn’t find another home for Captain, she tried to relinquish him to OC Animal Shelter and was turned down because it was at max capacity and because she wasn’t an Orange County resident.

Lujack ran into the same issues at four other shelters.

Miley, an abandoned Pit bull mix, is one of 59 dogs waiting to be adopted at OC Animal Care.

A lot of rescue organizations and animal shelters such as OC Animal Care, require proof of residency to take in animals, limiting the options of Chapman students who rent houses and live in dorms.

The shelter has strict guidelines for accepting animals, according to OC Animal Care field worker Amy Hernandez. The shelter can’t be at max capacity, there must be proof of residency and the animal must be healthy and considered adoptable. There’s also a surrender fee which increased from $81 to $306 on September 1.

“People will do whatever they can to get around paying,” Hernandez said. “I can only imagine the amount of students who give up their pets because of financial issues, they’re not going to [want to] pay these fees.”

These restraints reduce the options for students who are unable to take care of their animals while they’re gone for the summer or if they move away after graduation.

When students are unable to find a new home for their pet or can’t relinquish it to a shelter, they sometimes abandon them on the streets with the assumption that the animal will be picked up by the authorities and end up in a shelter anyways, said Hayes.

Kimara Velez, a junior public relations and advertising major, adopted two pet bunnies, Molly and Bambi, with her roommate freshman year.

After a couple weeks of keeping the rabbits in their dorm room in South Morlan, Velez opened the bright green door to find Molly dead, cause unknown. Bambi was getting too big to keep in a dorm room, so Velez set him loose in the Morlan courtyard.  

Maggie, a relinquished chow-lab mix, is one of 30,000 animals taken in at OC Animal Care in the past year.

“We couldn’t take care of them,” Velez said. “Bambi was better off on his own.”

Other students turn to friends and family to take in the pets they can’t take with them.

Sienna Newton, a junior strategic and corporate communications and psychology major, bought a six-week-old Pomeranian, Casper, the second semester of her freshman year.

“I liked the idea of having a dog, but I didn’t realize how big of a responsibility it would be,” Newton said.

By finals week, Newton realized she couldn’t take Casper back to her home in London with her for the summer, so she decided to leave him with a family friend in Los Angeles. She never picked up Casper again.

“Students need to consider if it’s the best time in their life to have a pet right now,” Hayes said. “A pet is a lifelong commitment, not a semester-long one.”

The American Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) urges students who can’t make the commitment to look into volunteer opportunities at local shelters and rescue groups or find jobs pet sitting and dog walking.

Caf hacks: five ways to avoid a boring cafeteria meal

Spice up your food life with these simple and easy cafeteria hacks.

Burrito Bowl

Photo by Kelly Itatani

 

For those days when the walk to Qdoba is too far or your Panther Bucks are starting to get dangerously low, you can satisfy your burrito bowl cravings at the cafeteria. Start with the cilantro lime chicken and rice from the Simple Servings station and make sure to grab a knife and a bowl from the soup station. Fill your bowl with the rice, and, while you are near the soup station, add chopped lettuce from the salad bar along with beans, cheese, sour cream, salsa, or any other toppings from the chips and salsa station next to the toaster. Once you are sitting down, cut up the chicken, top your finished burrito bowl, and enjoy.

 

Iced Coffee

Photo by Kelly Itatani

 

Want an iced coffee from Starbucks without the 20 minute wait in line? Grab a clear glass, fill it with ice from the soda fountain, add your choice of hot coffee and then add your choice of milk or creamer. Take a wooden stirrer and get ready to be addicted because this staple is something you can make every day.

 

Sausage McMuffin

Photo by Cienna Roget

 

The omelette station can only be cool for so long, and since the breakfast in the cafeteria never changes, here’s a hack to fuel your mornings. Toast a bagel or english muffin in the toaster next to the nacho bar, and then head over to the hot breakfast section. Place a sausage patty and a large scoop of egg on one side of your bread. Throw some cheese in and a sauce of your choice, and you get a breakfast you can eat on the go.

 

Noodle Stir Fry

Photo by Kelly Itatani

 

Did you know you can go up to the pasta station and ask for plain noodles? Skip the spaghetti sauce and head to the wok station. Ask for whatever the wok station is serving without the rice. Once at your table throw the noodles into your wok bowl and mix it all together for a delicious noodle stir fry. Add sriracha or soy sauce to for an extra kick of flavor.

 

Soda Float

Photo by Kelly Itatani

 

The easiest hack of all, but the one no one thinks of. Use a cup from the soda station and fill it halfway with vanilla soft serve, making sure to leave room for the good stuff. Then utilize Randall Dining Commons’ Coca-Cola’s Freestyle machine and get any soda flavor your inner child desires. Sadly, this treat is only available on weekdays because the ice cream machine is put away on the weekends, but it’s the perfect sweet treat to brighten up a long day of classes during the week.

 

BONUS: Ice Cream Cookie Sandwich

Photo by Kelly Itatani

 

Didn’t think there was a way to make the caf cookies any better?  This one can get a little messy. Take two of your favorite cookies – vegan or regular – and put them on a plate. On one side of the cookie, pile on the soft serve and use the other cookie to top it off.

Subscriptions you need based off of your major

It’s nice to have something to look forward to, and almost everyone loves getting mail. So, a membership to any “subscription box” could be a refreshing surprise each month. The remaining question, is which box to subscribe to? Below are suggested monthly subscriptions for various majors.

Film Majors

Show Biz In A Box

What it costs: $30 per month

What’s inside: Interesting scripts, books, tips, production notices, celebrity contact info and more

Why it’s perfect for film students: It makes anyone who receives it feel like a show business insider and is sure to excite movie fans. Get it here.

English Majors

Book of the Month

What it costs: $12.50 per month with a yearly subscription

What’s inside: A monthly book that matches your interests and favorite genres. Each month, five books will be highlighted on your account and you can choose any of the five you wish.

Why it’s perfect for English students: It allows you to find new books and pushes you to read more novels. Get it here.

Dance Majors

SOX BOX

What it costs: From $10 to $75 per month

What’s inside: SOX BOX lets you customize your box by choosing from a variety of options. Your choices lead to your monthly socks and are a fun way to express yourself.

Why it’s perfect for dance students: Dance majors are so busy, well, dancing that they have time for almost nothing else. That includes shopping for socks. This would deliver pairs with ease and also let dance majors show individuality in their outfit choices. Get it here.

Peace Studies Major

Love With Food

What it costs: $8 per month

What’s inside: Eight or more unique snacks that are both tasty and healthy. No artificial flavoring, coloring or MSG is present. Additionally, all snacks are natural, organic or gluten-free. On top of that, the company donates one meal to a food bank in the U.S. every time a box is purchased.

Why it’s perfect for peace studies students: Try new snacks every month before committing to full-size products so you can buy with confidence, and for every snack box you purchase, you are donating at least one meal to a food bank around the country. You can start your good work as a peace studies student today! Get it here.

Communication Studies Major

Sticker Swaps

What it costs: Starts at $10 per month

What’s inside: Ten high quality die-cut vinyl stickers every month, all unique themes and sizes.

Why it’s perfect for communication studies students: Students walk across campus, swinging their Hydro Flasks plastered with stickers. But in case it’s not entirely covered yet, or you’re in need of a fresh look, you can get new stickers monthly to accessorize your water bottle and any other devices. What better way to *communicate* your passions to the people around you? Get it here.

Art/Graphic Design Majors

The Adult Coloring Book Box

What it costs: Starts at $14 per month

What’s inside: Adult coloring pack with six cardstock pages. Markers, watercolor, gel pens, coloring pencils, or crayons all work well with it.

Why it’s perfect for art or graphic design students: While you may love drawing, it can probably get tiring and somewhat stressful. This can reignite your love for art, by making it simple. Get it here.

History Majors

Nostalgia Crate

What it costs: $20 per month

What’s inside: Toys and games from the ‘80s, ‘90s or ‘00s. These will be new and sealed objects and will include various items from the last 30 years. Trinkets may include Furbies, lunchboxes, action figures and Beanie Babies.

Why it’s perfect for history students: A monthly dose of the last 30 years will be helpful and nostalgic for all history majors. Get it here.

Music Majors

Original Vinyl Records

What it costs: $20 per month

What’s inside: Six original vinyl records will be sent monthly. You choose the genres of music you like, and they ship similar music to you each month. The vinyl is checked to make sure that it isn’t scratched and will provide excellent music.

Why it’s perfect for music students: Music is beautiful, and sometimes hearing it on vinyl is the relaxing time everyone needs. Get it here.

Science Majors

Club Scikidz Lab

What it costs: $29.95 per month

What’s inside: Club Scikidz shows people the fun aspects of science through easy projects and experiments. Every subscription has career-based activities that involve various aspects of science and technology.

Why it’s perfect for science students: Science is cool, and the kids’ projects are perfect for a bored college student. Also, they can make a great party trick. Get it here.

“Its ok to not know what to do with your life”

Photo By COD News via Flickr. Photo taken on May 16, 2014

It’s not as easy as going to college to figure out what you want to do. While many students come to Chapman with a career in mind, others feel lost. In fact, according to research done by All About Careers, 52% of college students agreed with the statement, “I have no idea what I want to do”. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Feeling stuck in the curriculum is overwhelming, but success stories, such as Junior Kyle Harrington’s, show that there is hope for the lost.

 

What was your mentality going into college?

Going into college I knew I wanted to make video games, but wasn’t completely sure what that entailed. There are so many aspects and specialties to a field that come derivatively from other disciplines, but have their own unique factors to consider when specializing.

 

What were your interests?

Filmmaking, writing, puzzles, and a love for live performance. Prior to Chapman I had directed, acted, and sung for film and theater.

 

Did you compare yourself to the people around you since you weren’t sure of what you wanted to do?

I went into college putting a lot of trust into the curriculum of what the school recommended. What I ended up finding was that while I had a natural knack for using/learning the skills for Digital Arts, many of the people around me were much more passionate about specializing in visual effect or animation. I had to be true to myself when my grades were slipping that maybe my passion not precisely being art for games was what was getting in the way. I desired deeper coursework to emphasize in a different area. I wanted to focus on writing, game/level design, and direction for interactive media. In terms of my emotions, it’s really not easy to find a proper identity in the school when you spend half your time in the Dodge film school and the other half in the Schmid computer science school. It’s an odd combo with vastly different people. In a way, I ended up forming an identity as someone that was an advocate for this field of study at the school. It always feels validating when someone finds out about my major and gets excited about asking questions about video games or VR. I like to act as a force of gaining interest for my field with what I’m doing.

 

What is the major that you created? Did one specific thing spark something in you? How’d you do it?

My major is called “Interactive Media Design and Production.” I chose a name that umbrellas AR, VR, interactive theater, 360 video, or other interactive media all together. What spoke to me was growing up around my parents and what they did professionally alongside my love for video games. I saw a lot of what I see in video games at my parents’ jobs. Whether it was an interactive show with characters at a theme park or a website helping firefighters help people quicker, I thought it was the coolest thing in the world. My parents supported and helped me from the very beginning; a lot of the time asking me the hard questions so that I could have a stronger curriculum. The next step was working with my faculty advisor Adam Rote to make sure the curriculum and technicalities of the credits were all in place. The final step was gaining a signature from Janell Shearer, the chair of the Media Arts Division at Dodge, and sending it into the registrar’s office. Due to the great mentorship of the faculty, I was able to get the papers approved on the first pass.

 

What is something about yourself that makes you proudest?

Creating your own major really is not a piece of cake. It feels like having to prove yourself everyday in the classroom because it really is a privilege and an honor for the school to allow me to do what I do. I had to put some hard work into staying on track to graduate in four years! That’s honestly stressful beyond compare, but I can honestly say that it’s worth it when I know I’m learning what I need to learn and being prepared to take on a real “adult” job when graduating. I’m proud of myself for taking on this challenge and turning myself into the person with a skillset to make my own goals come to fruition. I’d definitely wish that others take advantage of the resources at the school.

 

At Chapman, the Career and Professional Development Centers have your back through your uncertainty. From scheduling a career appointment to annual Career and Internship expos on campus, your path is important to the school. Go to the Career Center for drop-in visits  or schedule an appointment to get career advising!

 

Here are a few pointers to find out what your interests and passions are:

 

Start small:

(photo courtesy of giphy.com)

You got one more year of college down. This is something to be proud of. However, feeling pressure from your friends and classmates who found jobs and internships is hard to be around if you aren’t even sure the path you’re on is the right one.  

Here are some suggestions on how to start small:

  • make a job listing on Craigslist for dog walking or babysitting
  • Take a walk down a small neighborhood with small businesses and ask for applications
  • Apply for jobs in corporate retail or in the food industry here (Ex: Chipotle, Blaze, Forever 21, etc): https://www.employmentguide.com/

 

Write down things that you enjoy within your job(s):

(photo courtesy of giphy.com)

Keep a journal during the job. According to the URMC Medical Encyclopedia, journaling everyday can “Help you prioritize problems, fears, and concerns”. This will help you choose your interests by process of elimination. Think to yourself, “What do I absolutely hate in this job?”

 

Stay inspired:

(photo courtesy of giphy.com)

“How do I stop hating people for being more successful than me?”

Don’t compare yourself to others. The comparison trap is your unrealistic perception of someone being more successful than you. At the end of the day, you don’t know what got them there. In an article for 99u by Laura Bacon, she offers an alternate way to approach someone else’s success by asking questions like, “What do I admire about them?”, “What are they modelling for me?”, or “What have they done to get where they are today?”

 

“Who am I?” tests:

(photo courtesy of giphy.com)

Maybe you’re impatient and giving yourself time to find your interests via jobs is not ideal. Aptitude tests are popular for all age groups and tell things about your skills that could otherwise go unnoticed by you. The website aptitude-test.com is one with an abundance of free tests ranging from verbal to quantitative skills. The Guardian created their own personality test. Once completed, there is a guide to help you take your results and apply them to a professional world scenario. Maybe you’ll learn something about yourself that you never knew.

 

Breathe:

(photo courtesy of giphy.com)

BREATHE. Take things day by day and your path will soon become more defined.

“Thinking well of yourself is an act of kindness that pays enormous dividend.” – Louise Hay

The best study snacks within 10 minutes of Chapman

Everyone’s had that moment where they’ve been sitting in the library for too long attempting to study, but failing because we can’t focus anymore. That moment is the perfect time to close your textbooks, power down your laptop, and refuel with a study snack! Here are five places within ten minutes of campus where you can grab some tasty treats between finals, featuring some of Developing Human Brain’s top 12 brain foods.

Blue Bowl and Growl Juice Pub

Fruits such as apples and blueberries have been proven to improve cognitive performance and memory, and nuts are filled with nutrients, fats, and carbs that we need to thrive. So, why not combine the two into a delicious acai bowl? Both Blue Bowl and Growl Juice pub offer different combinations of fruit blends and toppings that are combined into a filling, refreshing meal.

Photo by Anna Wilson

 

Photo by Anna Wilson

Click here for Blue Bowl’s menu.

Click here for Growl’s menu.

 

Blue Bowl’s Address and Hours:

417 S Main St

7am-7pm Monday-Saturday (closed Sundays)

Growl’s Address and Hours:

Photo by Anna Wilson

152-A N Glassell St. 

Monday-Friday: 8am-7:30pm, Sat-Sun: 10am-7:30pm

TIP: If you’re planning on going to Blue Bowl, allow ample time as the line often extends out the door anytime throughout the day, and be sure to park in the neighborhood across the street as the parking lot is very small. If you’re looking for more of a quick bite in between finals, Growl is the way to go.

 

Mead’s Green Door Cafe

 

Vegetables are another key food that can help your brain in the midst of the most stressful time of the semester. Mead’s can satisfy your veggie fix with items such as their homemade vegetable and hummus appetizer, the Green Power kale salad, and the Veggie Dee-Luxe pizza.

Photo by Anna Wilson

Click here for Mead’s Green Door Cafe’s menu.

 

Address and Hours:

642 W Chapman Ave

Monday-Friday: 6am-8pm, Saturday: 8am-8pm, Sunday: 8am-3pm

TIP: If you’re looking to get some fresh air, have a seat on their outdoor patio and enjoy the quirky art installations that give Mead’s its distinguishable charm.

Photo by Anna Wilson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thai Towne Eatery

 

Craving something flavorful and beneficial? Try a curry from Thai Towne Eatery. Turmeric, which is a key ingredient in most curries, is a powerful antioxidant that has been recognized to help just about anything, including fatigue from late night study sessions.

Photo by Anna Wilson

 

Click here for Thai Towne Eatery’s menu.

 

Address and Hours:

152 N Glassell St.

Monday-Saturday: 11am-3pm, 4-9pm (closed Sundays)

 

TIP: Along with your curry, order a Thai Tea for a sweet burst of caffeine.

 

Brot Coffee Coffee

 

The dreaded Starbucks line seems to grow even longer during finals, and every coffee shop in the circle seems to have no open space. But caffeine is almost a necessity in order to survive finals. Brot Coffee is just far enough from campus that you won’t face the long lines or crowds, but doesn’t require students to drive all the way across town for a decent cup of Joe.

Photo by Anna Wilson

Photo by Anna Wilson

Click here for Brot’s menu.

 

Address and Hours:

316 S Main St.

Monday-Friday: 6am-7pm, Saturday: 7am-7pm, Sunday: 8am-6pm

 

TIP: Not only does Brot serve delicious coffee, but they also have an entire menu dedicated to gourmet toast! There are a total of 16 unique toppings including Irish butter, Plum butter, and of course, the beloved avocado.

 

Green Tomato Grill

 

One of the most essential vitamins for energy is B12, and a great source of this vitamin is found in eggs, as well as minerals and fats, according to Developing Human Brain’s list. Green Tomato Grill offers two different egg scramble bowls with ingredients such as bacon, black beans, bell peppers, spinach, and cheese, as well as several different breakfast burritos, chilaquiles, and breakfast tacos all featuring eggs. If you have a morning final, consider stopping in for one of these savory breakfast items to help keep you energized.

 

Photo by Anna Wilson

Click here for Green Tomato Grill’s menu.

 

Address and Hours:

1419 N Tustin St.

Monday- Sunday: 8am-9pm

TIP: The breakfast menu is only served until 11am, so if you want one of these delicious egg dishes, be sure to stop in early.

Top Movies You Should Be Seeing This Summer!

Photo courtesy of Pexels.

In just a few short weeks, Chapman students will be free for the summer! One thing to do while you don’t have to stress about schoolwork is to catch some of the biggest Hollywood blockbusters of the year. Here are just a few of the many movies that are sure to give you some bang for your buck (or MoviePass) this summer.

*Spoiler Alert!*
Everything’s a sequel…

Avengers: Infinity War
Release Date: April 27

The long-awaited third installation of the franchise became the highest grossing film of all time by making $257 million within three days of its release, beating Star Wars: The Force Awakens by $10 million. Avengers: Infinity War features an all-star cast of Hollywood’s biggest names such as Robert Downey Jr., Chris Pratt, Scarlett Johansson and Chris Hemsworth (just to name a few). The stakes have never been higher in the Marvel Cinematic Universe as the Avengers and the Guardians of the Galaxy unite to stop the evil Thanos from finding all six Infinity Stones and destroying the universe.

Watch the Avengers: Infinity War trailer here.
To purchase tickets, click here.

Deadpool 2
Release Date: May 18

Following the success of its first installment, Deadpool 2 tells the story of the crude and raunchy superhero Deadpool created by Marvel Comics as he forms his own team of mutant heroes called the X-Force to save a young mutant Russell from the time-travelling villain, Cable.

Watch the trailer for Deadpool 2 here!
To purchase tickets, click here.

Solo: A Star Wars Story
Release Date: May 25

Only five months after the release of The Last Jedi, Disney and Lucasfilm present the origin story of one of the most beloved characters in the series, Han Solo, in the latest installment of the mighty Star Wars franchise. Through a series of dangerous adventures, Han Solo (played by Alden Ehrenreich) meets his future co-pilot Chewbacca and confronts the notorious gambler and smuggler Lando Calrissian (played by musician and actor Donald Glover).

Watch the trailer for Solo: A Star Wars Story here.
To purchase tickets, click here.

Ocean’s 8
Release Date: June 8

This all-female addition to the Ocean’s franchise features eight incredible actresses, including Sandra Bullock, Cate Blanchett, Anne Hathaway and Rihanna. Follow these ladies as master criminal Debbie Ocean recruits seven other thieves to pull off the heist of the century at the annual Met Gala. Their goal? To steal a diamond necklace that’s worth more than $150 million.

Watch the trailer for Ocean’s 8 here.
To purchase tickets, click here.

Incredibles 2
Release Date: June 15

A family-friendly superhero film brought to you by Disney’s Pixar Studios, Incredibles 2 picks up where the original film ended 14 years ago. In this film, Elastagirl starts a new job to campaign for the return of the “supers”, while Mr. Incredible faces his greatest challenge yet: staying home to supervise Violet, Dash and Jack-Jack. In addition, the superhero family joins their ally Frozone to fight a new villain: the Screenslaver.

Watch the trailer for Incredibles 2 here.
To purchase tickets, click here.

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom
Release Date: June 22

A little under two months after Avengers hits theaters, Chris Pratt returns to the big screen for his second movie of the summer to lead the second installation of the new Jurassic Park series. After the failed experiment of creating a dinosaur-themed theme park, Owen Grady and Claire Dearing return to the island to rescue the remaining dinosaurs from a volcano that’s about to erupt. On their journey, they come in contact with terrifying new breeds of dinosaurs while discovering a conspiracy that threatens life as they know it.

Watch the trailer for Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom here.
To purchase tickets, click here.

Ant-Man and the Wasp
Release Date: July 6

Paul Rudd returns as the iconic size-shifting superhero and teams up with the Wasp, played by Evangeline Lilly. Set between the events of Captain America: Civil War and Avengers: Infinity War, Scott Lang tries to balance his home life with his duties as Ant-Man as he is presented with a new mission to uncover secrets from the past.

Watch the trailer for Ant Man and the Wasp here.
To purchase tickets, click here.

For even more awesome movies coming out this summer, click here.

All Gifs courtesy of Giphy. 

What You Need to Know About Orange County’s Primary Elections on June 5th

Courtesy of Shutterstock.

June is just around the corner. Whether you’ve been itching to get politically involved or simply want to be informed about the politics of Orange County, here is what you need to know about the Orange County Municipal Primary Elections.

What are primaries?

Primaries are elections held to narrow the field of candidates for a given elective office or to determine the nominees for political parties in advance of a general election. Primaries occur on a national level but also take place locally in smaller counties, cities and states.

When will the primaries take place?

The Orange County primary elections will be held on June 5, 2018.

What positions are being voted on?

Orange County will be conducting primary elections for the board of supervisors, county assessor, district attorney-public administrator, county sheriff-coroner, county treasurer-tax collector, county superintendent of schools, county clerk-recorder and superior court judges. On a larger scale, there will be a primary for California’s governor, treasurer, lieutenant governor, Orange County’s representative for Congress and state Senate.

What do each of those positions entail?

Feeling lost? Don’t worry, here is a short breakdown of responsibilities for each role:

Orange County’s board of supervisors bear the largest authoritative role in the county’s government. This board is responsible for keeping tabs on the local government and the county’s special districts such as Orange County Fire Authority, Orange County Transportation Authority, and the Orange County Sanitation District. These districts determine the circulation, cleanliness, and safety of Orange County.
The county assessor is a local government official responsible for checking property values within county lines. This value is converted into an assessment, one component in the computation of real property tax bills. The county assessor is vital to Chapman students who are looking for affordable property as well as addressing the never-ending property value concerns that Orange County residents face.
The district attorney-public administrator oversees law enforcement, ensuring that the law is conducted and enforced in a moral and just manner.
Candidates for county sheriff-coroner will be found on the ballot as well. The coroner determines the cause, time, and place of deaths, and the job is much like what is seen on TV or in movies.
Money, and the management of money, must be in the hands of a trustworthy individual, hence the importance of a county treasurer-tax collector. The county treasurer-tax collector is responsible for financial management and tax collection in the county. A vital task of a tax collector is to manage, as well as provide funding for, schools, parks and roads.
Regarding education, the election of Orange County’s next county superintendent of schools is not to be overlooked by any means. A superintendent makes daily decisions about staff, student life and educational programs. A superintendent also holds a substantial role in the communication between the parents and staff of a given educational system, providing accommodations whilst keeping the system fair and balanced.
For long-term residents of Orange County, the preservation of privacy for records from real estate transactions is critical. The person in charge of a role like this must be responsible and extremely meticulous in order to ensure a feeling of security amongst the county’s residents. This responsibility lies within the hands of the county clerk-recorder.
Lastly, the superior court judges, members of the superior court who hold jurisdiction over the county’s cases. Whether it be a parking ticket or a criminal case, the people who make day-changing or life-changing decisions must represent the people and be just with verdicts.
While Orange County has not yet released its full list of candidates for the local primary election, many positions have already been endorsed and have gained traction. For example, candidates for governor have begun hostin campaign events and various fundraisers to promote their platforms. It is important for students to remain aware of the upcoming primary election, and stay tuned for more updates about candidates. The following candidates are the frontrunners for their respective party’s primary, and should be further researched by all voters.

National level representatives to be aware of:

Top Candidates for Orange County’s District State Senator

Photo courtesy of Katelyn Antilla and Ela Suvak.

Photo courtesy of @Jestin4CASenate.

Top Candidates for Orange’s Congress Representatives

Photo courtesy of Katelyn Antilla and Ela Suvak.

Photo courtesy of By Russell Rene Lambert II.

Main Candidates for Governor:
Antonio Villaraigosa, former Mayor of Los Angeles
Gavin Newsom, Lieutenant Governor of California
Amanda Renteria, national political director for Clinton’s 2016 campaign
John Chiang, California State Treasurer

Let your voice be heard! Register to vote in future elections online by following this link: https://registertovote.ca.gov/

For additional information on the categories and what they mean in Orange County, check out these links:

General Information:

Board of Supervisors:
Orange County, California – Board of Supervisors

District Attorney:

Special Districts:
http://www.ocsd.org/divisions/fieldops/emb/special

Coroner:
Orange County, California – Coroner

Tax Collector:
Tax Collector Duties & Responsibilities

Superintendent & Orange County’s Department of Education:
OCDE.us – County Superintendent of Schools
OCDE.us – About OCDE

Clerk Recorder:
Orange County, California – Clerk-Recorder – Hugh Nguyen

Superior Court Judges:
The Superior Court of California – County of Orange