Five Tips to Keep Political Peace at the Holiday Table

As eggnog is poured and rolls are served, a looming topic of debate is likely to come up: politics. Especially with midterm elections recently occurring, students at college are more inclined to form independent political views without family pressures. Holiday gatherings – infamous for family arguments – may very well be the first time students will join in on the political debate and share their differing political opinions.

Dr. Carolyn Brodbeck, associate professor in psychology at Chapman, talked to Prowl about coping mechanisms intended to help prepare students for political disagreements that may await them at home. Here are five tips that stood out.


  1. Before heading to dinner, self-reflect.

As students spend a majority of time with peers and professors in a college setting, their beliefs may change or develop to differ from how they were raised. As a result, “a student may perceive their place in the family as changing,” Brodbeck states, which requires a reflection on one’s own beliefs as a separate entity. In the process, it is useful to reflect on the university experience in shaping ideas, as well as your place in the family and in the world. Ask yourself for example, “How would I describe my current relationship with my family? How has my relationship with my family changed since embarking on my Chapman university experience? What do I see as the most important challenges that my family and community are dealing with?” Brodbeck informs.

Self-reflection is important to creating a sense of awareness of the world around an individual, an essential part of the university experience as we learn to become more independent. Photo by Alyssa Harrell.


  1. De-escalate the debate.

Instead of lashing out at family members for their differing political views, note contrasting opinions and separate them from your relationship with the individual. “Dad, I can see that we have extremely different perspectives on this political issue. It seems like this is really important to you. I just want to let you know that I will always respect you as my father even if we don’t agree on this or other topics,” Brodbeck uses as an example.

Because many discussions occur at the table, it is useful to simmer down a heated debate with compliments about the food. Photo courtesy of Claire Treu.


  1. Use entertainment to divert debate.

Before heading home for the holidays, look to your favorite games to steer the altercation into a friendlier direction. Plan in advance, having games like “Monopoly” or “Life,” to extinguish a brewing or heated political debate. Just maybe don’t suggest Cards Against Humanity…

Games typically require sole concentration, so it is a good way to steer clear of debate either temporarily or permanently. Photo by Alyssa Harrell.


  1. Help out in the kitchen.

Although it is nice to show appreciation directly at the holiday table, a good way to express your gratitude is through helping set, serve, and clean up after the meal. This acts as a good way to escape from argument while earning respect from your family members. “Your grandparent or whoever is heading chef duty will be grateful that you are taking the initiative to help out!” Brodbeck states.

Heading into the kitchen is a good way to contribute help to the table rather than another person to engage in conflict. Photo by Alyssa Harrell.


  1. Engage in family tale-telling.

In a heavy discussion, make light of the situation through compliments of a family member. Perhaps ask how holiday dinners were when older family members were growing up. “Your interest shows respect, especially towards courageous ancestors who have made today possible,” Brodbeck informs.

The telling of familial stories promotes bonding as it steers away from a perhaps less than desirable debate. Photo by Lisa Fotios from Pexels.


 

5 Free Seat Filler Websites That’ll Get You Closer to the Action

These five seat filling services will give you seats to some of television’s most talked about events, including TV-show tapings, awards shows, and even the option to watch stars strut the red carpet. The best part? They’re all free!

Be careful though, these events can have a catch; being a seat filler to events such as award shows often entails moving to open seats when celebrities leave. This type of seat-filling service does not guarantee a permanent seat. Some events even have strict restrictions to uphold the audience appearance on camera, which could mean anything from having to wear neutral colors to locking your phone up before you enter the studio. They can base their audience decisions on looks, picking only applicants who fulfill a particular image that producers and promoters are looking for.

Should you be selected, sitting in on a favorite show or dancing at a free concert can be a great way to show visitors you know your way around Los Angeles. You may even get a selfie with a celebrity when they walk the red carpet or have the chance to wave to the friends back home when you’re on TV. Here are some of the services that can get you closer to the action.

1iota

Adam Levine and other members of Maroon 5 sing “Girls Like You” on Jimmy Kimmel’s Outdoor Concert stage. Photo by Lily Currin.

What TV shows can I sit in on?

“The Voice,” “Will and Grace,” “Jimmy Kimmel,” “Good Morning America,” “The Talk,” “The Late Late Show with James Corden,” “Kelly and Ryan,” “Steve Harvey,” “World of Dance,” and more.

What special events can I attend?

Movie and TV Show Premieres, Outdoor Concerts, NBA events, iHeart Radio Festivals, Red Carpet events, and more.

How do I apply to events?

  1. Create a 1iota account on https://1iota.com/
  2. Fill out the profile with a picture and physical descriptions such as hair color
  3. Find an event you want to attend
  4. Fill out any additional questions that may be specific to the event
  5. You will receive an email that you have been placed on a waitlist
  6. Confirm your tickets once you have been taken off the waitlist
  7. Arrive at the event when specified, usually an hour or more before the event begins
  8. Attend the event!

How far in advance must I apply?

Applications open two to three weeks before events.

Can I take a friend?

It depends. Not all events allow you to apply for more than one ticket but some events allow you to bring one to three unapproved friends.

How long are the events?

Events can range from three hours to over six hours.

Where are these events?

Los Angeles, New York City, Indianapolis, and Nashville.

How old do I have to be?

Movie premieres range from ages 6 and up to ages 16 and up, whereas TV shows are usually restricted to 16 year-olds and onward, and special events can range from 18 or 21 and up.

Are there any other restrictions?

You must cancel tickets 24 hours in advance if you cannot attend the event.

Are there any other opportunities this organization offers?

There is the option to act as paid extras in shows like “13 Reasons Why.”

Website: https://1iota.com/

On Camera Audiences

“iCarly” star Jennette McCurdy greets fans on the orange carpet at the Nickelodeon Kid’s Choice Awards. Photo via Flickr user Eva Rinaldi.

What TV shows can I sit in on?

“Dancing with the Stars,” “Dr. Phil,” “American Idol,” “The Price is Right,” “America’s Got Talent,” “America Ninja Warrior,” “Family Feud,” “Big Brother,” “Deal or No Deal,” “Hell’s Kitchen,” and more.

What special events can I attend?

“Kids Choice Awards,” “Teen Choice Awards,” and more.

How do I apply to events?

  1. Register at http://www.on-camera-audiences.com/
  2. Find an event to attend
  3. Fill out questions specific to the event
  4. You will receive an email that you have been placed on a waitlist
  5. Confirm your tickets once you have been taken off the waitlist
  6. Arrive up to 2 hours before the event
  7. Attend the event!

How in advance should I apply?

Applications for the waitlist open up to 24 months in advance.

Can I take a friend?

Yes, but it depends on the event.

How long are the events?

Events can range from three hours to over six hours.

Where are these events?

Los Angeles, New York, Austin, Las Vegas, Chicago, and more.

How old do I have to be?

Special events can range from 18 and up to 21 and up.

Website: http://www.on-camera-audiences.com/

TV Tickets

“The Big Bang Theory” requires a live audience for the laugh track. From left to right sit Simon Helberg, Kunal Nayyar, and Kaley Cuoco. Photo via Flickr user Kaley Cuoco.

What TV shows can I sit in on?

“America’s Funniest Home Videos,” “Dr. Phil,” “The Big Bang Theory,” “Raven’s Home,” “The Conners,” “Last Man Standing,” “Face the Truth,” “Just Roll With It,” “Man with a Plan,” “Mr. Iglesias,” “The Neighborhood,” “The Ranch,” and more.

How do I apply to events?

  1. Find an event to attend
  2. Fill out application specific to the event
  3. You will receive an email that you have been placed on a waitlist
  4. Confirm your tickets once you have been taken off the waitlist
  5. Arrive up to two hours before the event
  6. Attend the event!

How far in advance must I apply?

Applications for the waitlist open 30 days in advance.

Can I take a friend?

It depends. Not all events allow you to apply for more than one ticket but some events allow you to bring between one and five unapproved friends.

How long are the events?

Shows can take up to three or more hours to film.

Where are these events?

Only in Los Angeles.

How old do I have to be?

Special events can range from 18 and up to 21 and up for the applicant, but younger guests are welcome.

Website: https://www.tvtickets.com/seatfillers.htm

Seat Fillers and More

At events like the 2016 Grammy Awards at the Staples Center, seat fillers have to arrive early to live recordings. Photo via Flickr user David Jones.

What TV shows can I sit in on?

“Who Wants to be a Millionaire,” “Survivor,” and more.

What special events can I attend?

“The Emmy Awards,” “The Grammy Awards,” “BET Awards,” “Miss America Pageant,” Mini-Concerts, and more.

How do I apply to events?

  1. Register at https://seatfillersandmore.com/
  2. Send a resume and full body photo
  3. You will receive an email that you have been placed on a waitlist
  4. Confirm your tickets once you have been taken off the waitlist
  5. Arrive no earlier than 1 hour before the event
  6. Attend the event!

How far in advance must I apply?

Applications open two to three weeks before events.

Can I take a friend?

No, only those who apply may attend the events.

How long are the events?

Events can range from three hours to over six hours.

Where are these events?

Only in Los Angeles.

How old do I have to be?

Special events can range from 18 and up to 21 and up.

Website: https://seatfillersandmore.com/

TV Audiences

Seat fillers for the sport halftime shows often are let on the field to show enthusiasm for the artist. Pictured above is the 2012 Superbowl Halftime Show featuring Madonna. Photo via Flickr user SAB0TEUR.

What special events can I attend?

“The Tony Awards,” “The Emmy Awards,” “The Grammy Awards,” “The Academy Awards,” “The Superbowl Halftime Show,” and more.

How do I apply to events?

  1. Email SEATFILLERS@AOL.COM to find events you can attend
  2. Fill out application specific to the event
  3. You will receive an email that you have been placed on a waitlist
  4. Confirm your tickets once you have been taken off the waitlist
  5. Arrive up to 2 hours before the event
  6. Attend the event!

How far in advance must I apply?

Applications for the waitlist open 30 days in advance.

Can I take a friend?

No. Only those who apply are able to attend the events.

How long are the events?

Events can take up to three or more hours to film.

Where are these events?

Los Angeles, New York, and more.

How old do I have to be?

Special events can range from 18 and up to 21 and up for the applicant.

Website: http://www.tvaudiences.tv/

 

10 gifts you never thought your pet deserved

7% of pet owners dress their pets on a regular basis, 5% have given their animal a social media account and another 95% of pet owners admitted to having bought a Christmas gift for their pet, according to a recent survey conducted by Rover.com – the nation’s largest network of dog sitters and walkers.  

Make sure your pet isn’t overlooked when the holiday present come out. Here are 10 of the most ridiculous pet gifts we found.


1. Dog High Chair

Say goodbye to setting the table for one. Since the idea of letting your pet be a pet for 20 minutes seems absurd, check out this alternative. This pet high chair keeps your pup from sitting on your lap or at your feet begging for your food when you’re eating. Instead, it can have a chair of its own.

Price: Ranges from $56-$100

Photo Courtesy of Donna Slem.


2. Ceiling Cat Playground

Tired of your house being full of cat toys and scratch pads? Give your cat their own overhead playground to get them out of your hair. Combined with a wall bed to rest, you provide your cat a relaxed retreat.

Price: $102.50

Photo courtesy of Alexandra Botezatu.


3. The Doggy Thong

The Doggy Thong is fashionable and practical. Made of charcoal cloth, designed to neutralize a dog’s anal odors, it will keep Stinky smelling and looking great! We cannot, however, guarantee your dog won’t be bullied.  

Price: $15

Photo courtesy of Imgur.


4. Cat Music

Teyus Music, by musician David Teie from a soloist with the National Symphony Orchestra, has created a playlist specifically for cats. Teie bases his sounds on cats’ physiological traits and instincts. Incorporating feline-centric sounds – like the suckling for milk – can help cats relax, according to Applied Animal Behaviour Science.

Price: $15-$20 per album

Photo courtesy of Imgur.


5. Portable Fishbowl

Need to take your fish on a walk? Of course you do! Check out the stylish backpacks and handbags with built-in fish bowls that allow you and your pet to hit the town.

Price: $25.00

Photos from Michal Shibitali on Flikr.


6. Non-alcoholic wine for your cat

After a long day of work, sometimes you just need to sit down and enjoy a glass of wine. Why drink alone when your furry friend can join you? Infused with salmon oil and organic catnip!

Price: $5 for one bottle

Photos by Steve Heap on Pixabay & @pandabearsermahgerd on Imgur.


7. Petcube Camera – The Pet Equivalent of Skype

The Petcube camera lets you see and hear your pet in an HD wide angle lens when you’re out of the house. The product is also equipped with an interactive laser so you can play with your pet even when Snickers is home and you’re in Minsk.

Price: Ranges from $150-$179

Photo by @iceburg99 on Imgur.


8. Pawdicure Polish Pen

Look good, feel good. This non-toxic polish pen allows you to decorate your dog’s nails in a rainbow of colors. Do you still wonder why dogs bite people?

Price: $7.99

Photo courtesy of @tinyCartoonBeats on Imgur & @AjKaramba on Imgur.


9. Marry your pet

Are you in love with your pet? Well the two of you can share the same living quarters, enjoy tax benefits, and the sanctity of marriage. Just sign the marriage certificate – oh yeah – and pay.

The price: $230.00 for the “biggest” option, which includes an ‘I married my pet’ t-shirt, a certificate and a hand embroidered, personalized wall plaque to always remind you of your special day.

Photo by Amber Lou on Imgur & Michelle Geer on Imgur.


10. Kitty tunnel

Keep your kitty in the holiday spirit by giving him a soft and warm place to cuddle – or hide while being chased away from the Christmas decorations or holiday roast.

Price: $16.99

Photo courtesy of Claire Treu.


From putting your pooch in a high chair to getting married to them, you never know how far some pet owners will go for their pet.

How I Found Out Santa Wasn’t Real

Trigger warning: This article contains content regarding the existence of Santa Claus. This content may cause feelings of betrayal or loss of innocence.

When the beard comes off and the true identity of Santa Claus is revealed, Christmas loses some of its magic. Children usually find out that Santa is a myth around the age of eight, according to a 1980 study performed by Eastern Michigan University researchers.

Here, six Chapman students tell us how they found out the hard truth of Santa Claus.


Santa Quits Through a Letter

Every year Santa would write Davis Anderson, sophomore strategic and corporate communication major, and her sisters letters congratulating them on their accomplishments. Anderson loved getting these letters. She distinctly remembers one year anxiously peeling open Santas letter to read: “Dear Davis, I hate to break it to you, but I’m not real.”  She was crushed.

Anderson still celebrates the holidays despite a crushing childhood memory. Photo by Julianna Franco.


“The Talk” Takes A Turn

Marissa Dunn, junior strategic corporate communication major, was about 11 years old when she got the ‘girl talk.’ Her mother explained that Dunn’s body would be going through a variety of changes soon. It was nice at first, until the mother started to explain the menstrual cycle and what would happen every month.  Dunn burst into tears. Reality seemed so cruel. “Is Santa even real?!” she blurted out.

Sorry, kid.

“I felt I actually became a woman,” in that moment.

Dunn is now able to smile about the devastating day she “became a women.” Photo courtesy of Marissa Dunn.


Investigation Backfires

Santa didn’t add up for Trey Makishima, sophomore TV writing and production major, and his sister. The two started their search by cross referencing wrapping paper and gift tags they had around the house with what Santa had brought. They compared Santa’s penmanship to that of their parents and relatives They brought the evidence of their investigation to their parents – proof that the fat man was a fraud.

Great, said mom and dad: Since you don’t believe in him anymore he won’t bring you anymore gifts.

Makishima decided the truth hurt too much: He faked renewed belief in Santa for the next three years.

Makishima is made into a decorated Christmas ‘Trey’ – ‘tree.’ Pictured: Avery Girion, sophomore, Trey Makishima, sophomore, Graham Byrne sophomore. Photo courtesy of Trey Makishima.


Early Santa Delivery?

Javari Hunt, sophomore public relations and advertising major, was eight years old when she snuck into her mother’s room to check out a pair of high heels she knew would be under her mother’s bed.

Next to to the heels she saw a wrapped present in the shape of a Bratz doll box. What a coincidence! That’s exactly what she had asked for from Santa! And the tag read “From Santa!” But the handwriting on the tag looked just like as her mom’s. Santa must have dropped off her gif early and in a rush and “my mom did him a favor and wrote his name on the tag,” she rationalized.

Christmas morning she opened the same present she spotted under the bed, and her mom looked at her with a big smile. “He dropped that off, fresh this morning, while you were sleeping,” her mother said. It was then she knew the truth.  

Hunt thinks back to how strong her trust in her mother was, before the Santa lie. Photo Courtesy of Javari Hunt.


Grandma Goes Hardcore

Ali Whu, sophomore strategic corporate communication major, was eight years old when her aunt asked her grandma where she bought the play kitchen that Whu loved so much. Grandma explained that Whu’s mom had bought it for her.

“No, Santa bought it for me,” corrected Whu.

Her grandma then looked at her dead in the eye and said, “Well now you know Santa isn’t real.”

Whu remembers the good days before she was exposed to the truth of Santa. Photo courtesy of Ali Whu.


The Text That Changed It All

Cassidy Kaufmann, freshman business administration major, is Jewish. She didn’t realize the significance of Santa until she ruined it for a friend.

“Santa isn’t real,” Kaufmann sent.

Her friend was heartbroken. Kaufmann stole away the magic of Christmas in a matter of seconds. Though they are still friends, Kaufmann knows she is responsible for stealing her friends innocence.

Kaufmann poses with a cookie, although she never put any out for Santa. Photo by Julianna Franco.


 

Breaking Down the Movie Loyalty Programs for Theaters Close to Chapman

Movie tickets can be extremely expensive these days, especially if you’re a broke college student. Thankfully, many theaters and ticketing companies provide various loyalty programs for movie-goers to save on some cash and not to miss out on any of the biggest new releases. Here are five different loyalty programs that work at all the movie theaters within a five-mile radius of Chapman along with some pros and cons of being a member.

 

AMC A-List

AMC A-List may have be the most expensive loyalty program on this list, but it’s packed with benefits! Graphic by Ethan Williams.

Pros:

  • You’re able to see at most 12 movies a month for $20, which is quite the deal!
  • You’re able to see films in the IMAX and Dolby theaters for the same price as you would pay for any a 2D movie
  • Shorter lines at the concession stand
  • You’re able to reserve your seats online
  • You get a free large popcorn and drink on your birthday!

Cons:

  • Dropping $20 a month can be quite spendy depending on your financial situation
  • It’s only valid at one theater near Chapman

Atom Rewards

When using the Atom Tickets app, you’re able to purchase and have access to your tickets through your phone. Graphic by Ethan Williams.

Pros:

  • The program allows you to link other memberships like AMC A-List to your account, giving you the ability to use your three free movies a week from A-List to count towards a fourth free movie on Atom Rewards
  • The program is not subscription-based, so there’s no pressure to get your money’s worth

Cons:

  • You still have to pay for three movie tickets at regular price if you want the fourth ticket free
  • Like AMC A-List, it’s only valid at one theater near Chapman

Cinemark Movie Club

While Cinemark Movie Club may only provide one free ticket a month, it is the cheapest subscription-based loyalty program on this list. Graphic by Ethan Williams.

Pros:

  • $8.99 a month is less than one average movie ticket in Southern California
  • Discounts on expensive concessions definitely come in handy
  • The Century Stadium 25 is the closest theater to Chapman

Cons:

  • Again, this program is only valid at one theater near Chapman
  • You still have to pay extra for premium screening like the XD Theater

Fandango VIP Plus

Much like the Atom Tickets, Fandango allows you to purchase movie tickets through your phone. But this time it can be used for more movie theaters! Graphic by Ethan Williams.

Pros:

  • If you link your Atom Rewards account to AMC A-list, you can use your three free movies a week can count towards a fourth free movie
  • The program is not subscription-based, so there’s no pressure to get your money’s worth
  • It works at multiple theaters near Chapman

Cons:

  • You still have to pay for movie tickets at regular price in order to get discounts and rewards
  • There’s a service charge for buying tickets through Fandango
  • You have to see a lot of movies to in order to gain enough points for some serious discounts

 

MoviePass

MoviePass has had a rough past year in terms of making a profit and its customer service. If you’re considering to finally get a MoviePass, proceed with caution. Graphic by Ethan Williams.

Pros:

  • MoviePass can be used at the most theaters out of all the loyalty programs on this list
  • Three movies a month for around $10 is less than one average movie ticket in Southern California

Cons:

  • You’re only able to watch a select group of films that changes from day to day
  • Due to poor management from the company, the app rarely works these days, restricting you from getting a ticket
  • MoviePass has notoriously bad customer service

 

Overall, if you’re an avid movie fan, AMC A-List is definitely the biggest bang for your buck. If you’re a bit more casual and only tend to see only one film a month, Cinemark Movie Club may be your best option. Atom Rewards and Fandango VIP Plus may not be the best option alone if you want to watch movies for cheap, but they do come in handy when linked to other loyalty programs like AMC A-List. As for Moviepass, recent announcements from the company have revealed changes to their structure, including newer payment tiers that allows subscribers access to more free movies per month. Since these changes won’t be put into effect until January 2019, it’s hard to determine whether this will actually save MoviePass from its poor customer service or dysfunctioning app, but it does look promising.

The Five Types of People at the Gym

You head to the gym to burn off that muffin top, get that six-pack, or squat your body weight until your thighs fall off, but there is always someone there to ruin your workout groove. Look at the bright side: your eyeballs will get a great workout from all of that rolling!

Prowl recreated five types of gym rats that no one wants as a workout buddy, but do make for some great entertainment to distract you from the burn.


1. The Narcissist

You can usually catch this person staring at themselves in the mirror. That leg press you wanted? Sorry! The leg press – and every other piece of equipment – is required as a prop for The Narcissist’s selfies. If The Narcissist is not on the bench snapping pics, he’s sitting on it while posting the pics on social media to show off to an imagined audience. “Hey, everybody: I’m at the GYM!”


2. The Loud One

This is the person who belts out a gladiatorial scream at the top of their lungs while lifting. When they drop their weights, you stop, drop and cover thinking the giant earthquake has finally arrived. The last thing you want to do is ask them to be quiet in fear that you may be the next weight they slam on the ground.


3. The Slob

You will never catch this person wiping down the equipment after they’re done using it. Everybody gets sweaty at the gym and nothing can change that. The gym provides free towels – but “The Slob” never uses them. This person may also leave weights on the equipment after they’re done. Obviously, putting them away is someone else’s job.


4. The Know-It-All

This is often the weakest person in the gym. You will usually find them critiquing someone else’s form when they don’t even know enough to wear closed-toe shoes in the gym. Their favorite hobbies include researching workouts, but never actually doing them.


5. The Clueless One

There is nothing wrong with being a beginner; everyone has to start from somewhere. With that being said, sometimes it looks like these people don’t even know what exercise even is. These people usually look like they’re at a playground rather than a public gym. Oh really, you think riding that elliptical machine like a rocking horse is how it works?


All GIFs created by Ethan Williams and Mitchell Melby.

The new ban on e-cigarette flavors is creating restrictions that reach beyond kids

“I tried (vaping) and I was like this is like smoking a cigarette. But I’m not waking up with phlegm in my throat, my clothes aren’t reeking, and it’s cheaper,” said Alex Hallerman, a junior communications major. Photo by Wikimedia Commons.

Use of e-cigarettes by high school students has jumped 78 percent since last year while middle schoolers saw a 48 percent increase, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). 

Vaping and e-cigarettes have become such a dangerous trend among youth, that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) believes it to have reached epidemic proportions according to FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb.

There is evidence that nicotine, a highly addictive substance found in cigarettes and vapes, can harm the brain development of teenagers. Studies have also shown that vaping in earlier years has a stronger link to later use of regular cigarettes and other tobacco products, according to the American Cancer Society.

“This troubling reality is prompting us to take even more forceful action” – such as ending the sales of flavored e-cigarettes, banning flavors in cigars, banning the market of e-cigarette products to children and finally, banning menthol flavor for cigarettes and cigars – “to stem this dangerous trend,” Gottlieb said.  

This new ban will restrict flavors that appeal to kids, such as cherry and vanilla, from being sold in retail stores and some online manufacturers. Following the proposals, the FDA took action in September 2018 to begin the process by issuing out warning letters and fines to retailers who illegally sold e-cigarette products to minors, according to the American Cancer Society. Still, some Chapman students believe that this proposal won’t have much of an impact on the vaping habits for young people.

Juul user Alyssa Houston, 20, is below California’s 21+ legal age to buy any tobacco-related products. But Houston either has her older friends buy Juul pods for her or she goes to select gas stations where she knows that she won’t get carded, she said.

“Personally, I only like mint so I’m not affected by [the ban] but I feel like people [who are affected] will still find a way to get the flavors they like,” said the junior communications major.

Though the proposal was made to deter recreational use by kids, limiting flavors and methods in which students get their e-cigarette supplies appears to be insufficient to curb existing addictions for some.

After being introduced to a Juul through a friend during her senior year of high school, Houston said she has been hooked ever since.

Smoking her Juul has become more about the habit and less about the sensation, she said. While the Juul gives her the occasional head rush, “after hitting it all day long, it eventually doesn’t faze you,” Houston said.

Then, there’s the habit: “There’s just a feeling of having (a Juul pen) – it’s like having your cell phone on you,” Houston said.

Raising the age restriction from 18 to 21 for California back in 2016 was the first attempt to impede the rising popularity of e-cigarettes among youth. However, age laws are becoming futile as students have found ways to bypass the rules.

Houston agrees that e-cigarette usage and kids are not a good combination. “I know people who will do it in the movie theaters and stuff but it’s like, have respect for other people. Also, when there are kids around I feel bad so I don’t do it around them,”  Houston said.

While Houston restricts her Juul use around kids, she thinks Juuling is just a new trend in society, she said.

“It’s sad that little kids are doing it but I also think that there’s always something new that comes out that’s not good for kids and it’s better that it’s this than something worse,” Houston said.

The most important thing when it comes to vaping is finding the right merchant, said Tori Erikson, a freshman biology major.

Erikson began vaping with a mod (a bigger type of e-cigarette) when she was 17-years-old.  

“Once the law passed [that changed the age restriction], a lot of shop owners would still sell to their past customers,” Erikson said.

Erikson was able to get e-cigarette juice through friends who had forged relationships with a merchant or supplier while they were still underage.

But some argue that vaping is a less harmful way to ingest a substance – nicotine – to which they have long been addicted.

Since smoking a pack of cigarettes a day since he was 17-years-old, Alex Hallerman was able to quit his two-year-long relationship with tobacco by switching to vapes, said the junior communications major.

The FDA’s proposition could prevent other students who are in similar situations, Hallerman said.

Before making the switch, he tried nicotine gum, the patch, and even Chantix, a smoking cessation aid that can help people quit smoking, he said.

“That’s what my parents pushed me towards but I was like, ‘no you don’t understand. I need the hand-to-mouth thing,’” Hallerman said.

David Daleo, the owner of Dr. Vapor, the Old Towne Vape shop in the circle, is concerned that the ban will keep more people smoking cigarettes.

“When you vape something that tastes completely different than tobacco, you enjoy it. I know that their concern is that we’re going after kids, but adults like flavor too,” Daleo said.

After targeting larger companies such as Juul Labs, the mounting pressure from the FDA has made the company suspend sales of their flavored pods at their stores. But gas stations, convenience stores, and other outlets are still able to sell Juul products.

As of right now, Daleo isn’t worried about his two vape stores. He believes much more robust legislation will need to occur before his storefronts will lose sales.

“I see the concern but until they start focusing on California I’m not worried. Once they do, it’ll be the death of our industry,” he said. “We pride ourselves in having a variety and I have hundreds of flavors here.”

This time, it’s PERSONAL: 10 DIY Gifts You Can Make in One Sitting

Giving gifts in holiday “Secret Santa” swaps and white elephant gift exchanges can be so unsentimental and impersonal. Here are 10 inexpensive and easy to make do-it-yourself gifts likely to make the recipient remember you long after they’ve used up the balance on the Amazon and Starbuck cards they received from less crafty gift givers.

1. Handmade Clay Dishes

These stylish bowls can be various sizes and hold more than just rings; they can be plant saucers or hold office supplies as well.  Photo by Lily Currin.

These polymer clay ring dishes look glamorous but are actually simple and cheap to make. But how? To achieve the marble effect, roll together multiple strands of colored polymer clay, flatten, shape it in an oven-safe bowl, and bake according to the clay’s instructions.  Spice it up with a simple finish and line the rims with gold acrylic paint after baked.

2. Hot Cocoa Ornaments 

Sprinkles, peppermint candies, and marshmallows add a pop of festive color to a hot cocoa ornament.  Photo via Instagram user Sprinklesomefun.

Fill a clear glass ornament with hot cocoa mix to brighten the day of any recipient. You’ll need 2 cups of confectioners sugar, 1 cup of cocoa powder, and 2 cups of powdered milk to make your own homemade hot cocoa mix. Then funnel the mixture into the ornaments and drop in your favorite toppings. Just add hot water and you’ll have hot cocoa wherever you go! If you want to hang it on your tree, the cap might need additional support for the weight, so be sure to secure the top with clear packing tape.

3. An Artful Mug

This customized mug can be personalized to match the interests of your gift recipient.  Photo by Lily Currin.

Give your friends a warm reminder that you care every morning. You can customize any dishwasher safe mug when you use paint sharpies and then bake for 30 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit.  

4. Mystery Movie Box

Include enough snacks for two and you’ll have a built-in movie night for you and the recipient.  Photo via Instagram user Creativecarepackages.

All this gift takes is a classic DVD from the discount bin at Walmart and some appropriate snacks to throw in a fun movie themed box.  A mystery movie box is likely to appeal to any cinephile. To go the extra mile, try picking one of the recipient’s favorite films and include small trinkets or memorable treats that were enjoyed by the characters.

5. A Customized Plant 

This painted face gives personality to a miniature cactus. Photo by Lily Currin.

Make sure your gift doesn’t “succ” and give this one a try. Succulents are very trendy and don’t need much tending – a good choice for a gift to last well beyond the holidays. Customize the plant’s container by using acrylic paint to inscribe a specific face or design that is meaningful to the recipient, just make sure to paint before potting the plant!

6. Holiday Tea Bags

Adding labels to the peppermint tea bags is a simple and helpful touch. Photo by Lily Currin.

This gift could warm anyone’s heart this holiday season. These tea bags are so customizable you can make everything from hearts to tree bags.  All you need is tea filter paper, a needle and thread, and your favorite holiday blend.

7. Homemade Bath Products

Himalayan salt infused with a lavender scent can create a calming bath for stressed students. Photo by Lily Currin.

This self-care gift is so easy it doesn’t even require a trip to Lush! You can make an ordinary bath more relaxing by infusing Himalayan salt with your favorite combination of natural essential oils. Give the gift of a release from the stress of finals and provide them the relaxing break they deserve.

8. Make Their Own Gift

A watercolor set, brushes, and sketchpad is sure to be a welcomed challenge for any artist. Photo by Lily Currin.

For the artist friend, gather some supplies they may not use often so they can experiment and make their own gift. This is a perfect present if you are intimidated by the do-it-yourself aspect of the other gifts.

9. A Personalized Vase

Acrylic paint won’t run with minor exposure to water. Photo by Lily Currin.

Flowers are a classic gift, so why not go the extra step? Simply use acrylic paint and painters tape to keep lines straight before applying paint. Customizing an old glass bottle to use as a vase is an eco-correct way to match a specific décor or upgrade a holiday bouquet.

10. The Gift of Style

The Chapman University shirt was cut in a triangle shape and given a new handsewn collar with an eyelet fabric.  The “Love is Love” shirt was tie-dyed and the message was ironed on. Photo by Lily Currin.

Customized shirts are a cheap way to add some original flare to your recipient’s wardrobe. You can tie dye, cut, or iron on messages to any t-shirt you desire. It’s a way to show their personality or show some school spirit.

Sleigh the Holiday Season at Your College Home Away From Home

End of semester stress may have you feeling like the Grinch, but don’t let that crush your holiday spirit. You may have gotten into the groove of family traditions leading up to winter holidays in the past, but between finals and Southern California’s less-than-wintery weather, it can be easy to lose the holiday spirit. Here are five ways to celebrate the holiday season in your college home.


1. Deck The Hall

Many students take to decorating the inside of their dorms for the holiday season. Whip out the wrapping paper and the ribbons to include your dorm doors in the holiday spirit.

The welcome area in Argyros Forum has loads of butcher paper for free. Photo courtesy of Veronica Millison.

To make a tree:
  1. Cut about five feet of butcher paper into several small pointed strips.
  2. Fold the strips into a tube and tape the back, leaving the pointed edges on the outside.
  3. Flatten the taped strips and pull the outer point to create a raised effect.
  4. Tape the strips to the door, adding more as you work your way down to the stump.
  5. To create the stump, cut a small piece of butcher paper and put it on the bottom of the tree.
  6. You can also cut out ornaments of your desire or hang real ones using mini Command hooks.
To make a snowman:
  1. Cut enough butcher paper to make three circles of varying sizes, small, medium, and large.
  2. Tape onto the door the smallest circle on the top and largest on the bottom, connecting each one.
  3. Add a cutout hat, scarf and facial features – or draw them directly onto the circles.
  4. Cut small white circles and tape them sporadically on the door to create snow.

2. Make a Holiday Treat

Nothing says “Hello holidays!” like good food. No matter what you’re celebrating, ask for the family recipe to your favorite dish and share it with your roommates and professors. Bake with your friends in the fully stocked Morlan Hall kitchen – just bring your own ingredients and clean up when you are done.

Many students take to coffee to push through finals. Spice it up and treat yourself with a side of a holiday inspired coffee cake. Photo by Alyssa Harrell.

Easy Coffee Cake Recipe – inspired by and courtesy of Kristyn Merkley, from Lil’ Luna.

You will need:
  • A 9×13 inch pan (or proportional)
  • 2 eggs
  • 3 tsp of baking powder
  • 1 ½ cups of brown sugar
  • 2 tsp of cinnamon
  • 3 cups of flour
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 cup oil
  • ½ cup melted butter
  • 1 cup milk
Directions:
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Grease the pan and set it aside.
  3. Combine eggs, oil, milk, butter, and vanilla in a mixing bowl.
  4. In a smaller bowl, mix the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.
  5. Pour the content of the dry bowl into the larger mixing bowl and whisk to create the batter
  6. Pour the batter into the greased pan so that the top is even.
  7. To create the topping, mix together the brown sugar and cinnamon.
  8. Evenly sprinkle the topping over the batter in the pan.
  9. Using a butter knife, create swirls on top of the batter to blend the topping in.
  10. Bake for 30 minutes, let cool for two minutes, and enjoy!

3. Set the Winter Scene in SoCal

Although Southern California is not a winter wonderland, create the ambience yourself and make use of what SoCal has to offer. The fire pit at the dorm pool is open until 9 p.m. – giving you plenty of time to enjoy a night under the string lights roasting chestnuts and making s’mores.

If you don’t mind going off campus, the sand is SoCal’s snow. The beach is a great place to have a bonfire and roast your holiday treats.
Photo by Kimson Doan on Unsplash.


4. Join the Community

Grab your friends and go to the Tree Lighting Ceremony and Candlelight Choir Procession in the Orange Circle. This year, the ceremony will be held on Sunday, Dec. 2, from 3:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Don’t miss the tree lighting and music starting at 5:15 p.m. 

Shops and restaurants will be open for you to grab a bite while you enjoy the event. Photo by Alyssa Harrell.


5. Gather Your Friends For a Gift Exchange

No matter what you celebrate, gift exchanging has been made a large part of the holiday season. Additionally, it’s a great way to get together with your friends before the end of the year.

There are several options to gift-giving, perhaps the most common being Secret Santa and White Elephant. Photo by Alyssa Harrell.


 

Six tips from honors students on how to ace your finals

Prowl interviewed some University Honors Program students with the highest GPAs at Chapman to get some helpful tips on establishing better study habits, such as using the Pomodoro Technique, working with other people to get multiple perspectives on a topic and how to find the best study spot.

 

1. Try the Pomodoro Technique

Would you rather take three hours to get one thing done, or  an hour and 20 minutes to get four things done? The Pomodoro Technique, created by Francesco Cirillo in the 1980s, provides a framework to help you get more done in less time. The main premise behind the Pomodoro Technique is to work in blocks of time, typically 25 minutes long, followed by a five minute break. These intervals are named pomodoros, the English plural of the Italian word “pomodoro,” which translates to  tomato, after the tomato-shaped kitchen timer that Citrillo used as a college student. Each Pomodoro session demands your full attention on one task, and every break requires you to step away from your work to rest.

Here’s how to implement the Pomodoro Technique:

Make a to-do list of the assignments you absolutely need to do that day and set time frames for each task. For example:

  • 25 minutes – HON 498
  • 25 minutes – Portfolio
  • Five minute break
  • 25 minutes – IES 492
  • 25 minutes – Presentation
  • Five minute break

The result is improved productivity and satisfaction with your work, as well as decreased boredom.

Download the “Focus Keeper Free: work & Study Timer” app https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/focus-keeper-free-work-study-timer/id867374917

2. Get a planner

Even if you think that all of your assignments and reminders can be stored in your head, top students find  reminder apps, calendars, and planners to be extremely helpful in getting tasks done and remembering everything that you need to accomplish and when. The apps below allow you to set aside time for studying and set reminders to get your assignments in on time.

Recommended apps: Blackboard, Google Tasks

Photo by Marissa Dunn

 

3. Treat yo self!

As it turns out, giving yourself a small reward after a long study session is a good practice. Treating yourself can be as simple as watching a show or enjoying a nice meal. Try to make it less about expecting a reward and more about doing something to take care of your mind and body after a long day of work. Work-life balance is important, even in college! Of course, it’s also necessary to recognize that even if you didn’t finish reading the entire textbook before bed,you are still allowed to rest. Being kind to yourself and treating yourself  is a good rule of thumb.

4. Know when to work alone versus when to work with people

Working with people or in groups is only a great idea if you are struggling with the content on a conceptual level. Having a fellow student explain their take on a subject rather than a professor  can sometimes be effective and better for memory, as your peers may be able to explain concepts in simplified terms, which is easier to comprehend and remember than the more complex academic versions discussed in class. In the group setting, you get to hear multiple perspectives and work through your confusion with individuals in your group who understand the subject matter more fully. However, when it comes to memorizing and writing, it’s best to go solo. For example, study by yourself for test preparation, and then do a partner or group review the day before a big exam.

Photo by Marissa Dunn

5. Find your work space

Having a set place and time to study can make all the difference. Every honors student suggested establishing a work space far from distractions. Libraries are a good place to study because they are usually filled with people who are also working, reinforcing the notion that you are there to work – not to chit chat or surf the net.

Photo by Hannah Harp

6. Review as you go

Even if a test isn’t on the horizon, the act of reviewing material briefly helps store that information in your long-term memory, so you’ll already have it memorized when the test day arrives. One  activity that helps some students retain information is studying with a friend and verbally reviewing the material. By talking it out, especially the concepts that are the most difficult, some students find that they remember the conversation better on the test day and even find that explaining the information to a friend solidifies their understanding of the information. Plus, you get to hear your friend’s thoughts on the concept as well. It’s a win-win!

These students contributed to tips for this story:

  • Sofya Bochkareva
  • Brittney Bringuez
  • Taylor Killefer
  • Kylie Miller