10 gifts you never thought your pet deserved

7% of pet owners dress their pets on a regular basis, 5% have given their animal a social media account and another 95% of pet owners admitted to having bought a Christmas gift for their pet, according to a recent survey conducted by Rover.com – the nation’s largest network of dog sitters and walkers.  

Make sure your pet isn’t overlooked when the holiday present come out. Here are 10 of the most ridiculous pet gifts we found.


1. Dog High Chair

Say goodbye to setting the table for one. Since the idea of letting your pet be a pet for 20 minutes seems absurd, check out this alternative. This pet high chair keeps your pup from sitting on your lap or at your feet begging for your food when you’re eating. Instead, it can have a chair of its own.

Price: Ranges from $56-$100

Photo Courtesy of Donna Slem.


2. Ceiling Cat Playground

Tired of your house being full of cat toys and scratch pads? Give your cat their own overhead playground to get them out of your hair. Combined with a wall bed to rest, you provide your cat a relaxed retreat.

Price: $102.50

Photo courtesy of Alexandra Botezatu.


3. The Doggy Thong

The Doggy Thong is fashionable and practical. Made of charcoal cloth, designed to neutralize a dog’s anal odors, it will keep Stinky smelling and looking great! We cannot, however, guarantee your dog won’t be bullied.  

Price: $15

Photo courtesy of Imgur.


4. Cat Music

Teyus Music, by musician David Teie from a soloist with the National Symphony Orchestra, has created a playlist specifically for cats. Teie bases his sounds on cats’ physiological traits and instincts. Incorporating feline-centric sounds – like the suckling for milk – can help cats relax, according to Applied Animal Behaviour Science.

Price: $15-$20 per album

Photo courtesy of Imgur.


5. Portable Fishbowl

Need to take your fish on a walk? Of course you do! Check out the stylish backpacks and handbags with built-in fish bowls that allow you and your pet to hit the town.

Price: $25.00

Photos from Michal Shibitali on Flikr.


6. Non-alcoholic wine for your cat

After a long day of work, sometimes you just need to sit down and enjoy a glass of wine. Why drink alone when your furry friend can join you? Infused with salmon oil and organic catnip!

Price: $5 for one bottle

Photos by Steve Heap on Pixabay & @pandabearsermahgerd on Imgur.


7. Petcube Camera – The Pet Equivalent of Skype

The Petcube camera lets you see and hear your pet in an HD wide angle lens when you’re out of the house. The product is also equipped with an interactive laser so you can play with your pet even when Snickers is home and you’re in Minsk.

Price: Ranges from $150-$179

Photo by @iceburg99 on Imgur.


8. Pawdicure Polish Pen

Look good, feel good. This non-toxic polish pen allows you to decorate your dog’s nails in a rainbow of colors. Do you still wonder why dogs bite people?

Price: $7.99

Photo courtesy of @tinyCartoonBeats on Imgur & @AjKaramba on Imgur.


9. Marry your pet

Are you in love with your pet? Well the two of you can share the same living quarters, enjoy tax benefits, and the sanctity of marriage. Just sign the marriage certificate – oh yeah – and pay.

The price: $230.00 for the “biggest” option, which includes an ‘I married my pet’ t-shirt, a certificate and a hand embroidered, personalized wall plaque to always remind you of your special day.

Photo by Amber Lou on Imgur & Michelle Geer on Imgur.


10. Kitty tunnel

Keep your kitty in the holiday spirit by giving him a soft and warm place to cuddle – or hide while being chased away from the Christmas decorations or holiday roast.

Price: $16.99

Photo courtesy of Claire Treu.


From putting your pooch in a high chair to getting married to them, you never know how far some pet owners will go for their pet.

Five seniors give advice to freshman about what they learned at Chapman

Many students show up for their first day of college wide-eyed and unaware of what will happen during the next four years. Prowl talked to five seniors who have survived the four years of frat parties, horror story roommates, scary professors and the terror of midterms and finals to tell the tale — and give college advice, share experiences and reveal what they wish they had known or done differently.

 

Jonathan Hernandez, senior business administration major, Captain of Chapman Men’s baseball team.

From: San Mateo, California

My one regret is that I never got to study abroad, but as a college athlete I knew I could never do it. I never thought it would be something I wanted to do but after hearing friends experiences I would have loved to immerse myself in a new culture.

College is a learning experience, but not all my lessons came from the classroom. I became more independent learning how to cook, clean and budget money.

I never had a problem getting classes. It helped being a student athlete, and all the teachers were very understanding. So I would find a friend who has the same major and take your classes together so you have a study buddy and keep each other accountable.

I would tell freshman that you can treat these four years as party years and waste your time and be screwed for the real world or you can take classes seriously and be in a position after school to make good money and have fun for the rest of your life. You have to have a balance. If you want, you can find a party pretty much every day of the week, but you don’t need that. Get your work done and have fun on the weekend.

 

Sara Utsugi, communication major, libero on Chapman Women’s Volleyball team.

From: Aiea, Hawaii

I wish I had opened myself up sooner and taken advantage of more opportunities. I was pretty closed off my freshman year, so I wish I had let more people in sooner. I also wish that I stopped using volleyball as an excuse not to do things. I told myself that I was tired and didn’t have time to get involved, but if I had really made time to, I could have done so many more things.

I learned that seasons of life come and go so to not be upset or discouraged when things don’t go to plan because there is always something around the corner. I also learned that friendships — the true, lasting, tough-love friendships — are precious and require care and nurturing. And finally, I learned that it’s okay to be selfish. In fact, it’s necessary to be selfish when it comes to the love you show yourself and time you pour into your own growth because in the end, without self love and self respect it’s really hard to live your version of a full and meaningful life.

One reason I came to a smaller school was to avoid the scramble for classes and teacher attention. I would suggest creating at least two or three class schedule options just in case you can’t get in. Also, in the days leading up to your registration date, it’s a good idea to check back in on classes and see which ones are filling up. As for doing well in classes, my best tip is to show up for class both physically and mentally.

It was tempting to blow off homework and studying for hanging with friends, but I am the type of person who will always get my work done — it just might get done at 2 a.m. Find a balance between saying yes and no to invitations but do say yes. The late night runs to Pizza Press and 3 a.m. dorm room hangouts are the memories that you’ll take with you after college is over.

 

Henry Miller Mein, senior creative writing major

From: San Jose, California

I learned to be more of a people person. A college like Chapman brings with it hundreds of outlets of students and organizations and I was able to build many different connections with diverse students. Whether planning a concert or selling pickles at Picklefest, I managed to influence a lot of people.

Getting to know your professors is always important. This way you can develop a relationship early on. My plan in picking classes has always been to try to be early in registering, but if I’m waitlisted for a class I’ll try to go in and talk to the professor because it is likely you’ll be able to get in.

Try to make a connection with everyone you meet. Some might be small and end up not leading to anything, but a small interaction could also blossom into a long lasting friendship. Knowing a handful of people can help you work through college in times of need.

 

Serena Steele, senior communication studies major

From: Ontario, California

I wasn’t as involved on campus as much as I would’ve liked to, in part due to that I work a lot during the week.

I learned that my worldview is capable of changing every now and then. Classes and people here have challenged the way I think about myself and life. I come from a low-income, single mother household. There are so many different types of people here with a dissimilar background from mine. I’ve learned that I can’t change some people’s conceptions about welfare or low-income areas, but I can take what they taught me and grow from that.

Learning to ask for help when needed really helps. If you’re struggling with mental health or having familial issues, talk to your professors. Most of them will care and try to help. Also, don’t take any classes before 9 a.m.

You will probably never find the perfect balance. Some weeks, you will probably go out and party every night. Sometimes you’ll be stuck in the library for hours, eyes straining and fingers pounding away at your keyboard trying to make that 11:59 p.m. deadline. Don’t punish yourself over going out, because you need a good story to tell years down the line about that crazy thing you did as a freshman.

 

Reed Nakakihara, senior double major in accounting and business administration,

From: Santa Ana, California

I’ve learned a lot in college and one of the biggest is time management. From having to study, to going to basketball practice, to hanging out with friends, to doing laundry and cooking food, there is just so much to do. I’m thankful that I had to struggle with all of these things because it made me appreciate and respect what other people endure in life that have way more going on.

My best advice would be to take the classes that interest you. Don’t be so obsessed with the letter grade, rather, focus on understanding the big concepts and how you can use it to help you in the future.

Balance is a big part of freshmen year. You don’t want to have too much of one or the other. Obviously, your academics are important and should come first. My best advice is to work hard in the classroom and then reward yourself by having a good time with your friends whenever you can. As long as that doesn’t become a priority over academics, you will be just fine.

Six tips from honors students on how to ace your finals

Prowl interviewed some University Honors Program students with the highest GPAs at Chapman to get some helpful tips on establishing better study habits, such as using the Pomodoro Technique, working with other people to get multiple perspectives on a topic and how to find the best study spot.

 

1. Try the Pomodoro Technique

Would you rather take three hours to get one thing done, or  an hour and 20 minutes to get four things done? The Pomodoro Technique, created by Francesco Cirillo in the 1980s, provides a framework to help you get more done in less time. The main premise behind the Pomodoro Technique is to work in blocks of time, typically 25 minutes long, followed by a five minute break. These intervals are named pomodoros, the English plural of the Italian word “pomodoro,” which translates to  tomato, after the tomato-shaped kitchen timer that Citrillo used as a college student. Each Pomodoro session demands your full attention on one task, and every break requires you to step away from your work to rest.

Here’s how to implement the Pomodoro Technique:

Make a to-do list of the assignments you absolutely need to do that day and set time frames for each task. For example:

  • 25 minutes – HON 498
  • 25 minutes – Portfolio
  • Five minute break
  • 25 minutes – IES 492
  • 25 minutes – Presentation
  • Five minute break

The result is improved productivity and satisfaction with your work, as well as decreased boredom.

Download the “Focus Keeper Free: work & Study Timer” app https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/focus-keeper-free-work-study-timer/id867374917

2. Get a planner

Even if you think that all of your assignments and reminders can be stored in your head, top students find  reminder apps, calendars, and planners to be extremely helpful in getting tasks done and remembering everything that you need to accomplish and when. The apps below allow you to set aside time for studying and set reminders to get your assignments in on time.

Recommended apps: Blackboard, Google Tasks

Photo by Marissa Dunn

 

3. Treat yo self!

As it turns out, giving yourself a small reward after a long study session is a good practice. Treating yourself can be as simple as watching a show or enjoying a nice meal. Try to make it less about expecting a reward and more about doing something to take care of your mind and body after a long day of work. Work-life balance is important, even in college! Of course, it’s also necessary to recognize that even if you didn’t finish reading the entire textbook before bed,you are still allowed to rest. Being kind to yourself and treating yourself  is a good rule of thumb.

4. Know when to work alone versus when to work with people

Working with people or in groups is only a great idea if you are struggling with the content on a conceptual level. Having a fellow student explain their take on a subject rather than a professor  can sometimes be effective and better for memory, as your peers may be able to explain concepts in simplified terms, which is easier to comprehend and remember than the more complex academic versions discussed in class. In the group setting, you get to hear multiple perspectives and work through your confusion with individuals in your group who understand the subject matter more fully. However, when it comes to memorizing and writing, it’s best to go solo. For example, study by yourself for test preparation, and then do a partner or group review the day before a big exam.

Photo by Marissa Dunn

5. Find your work space

Having a set place and time to study can make all the difference. Every honors student suggested establishing a work space far from distractions. Libraries are a good place to study because they are usually filled with people who are also working, reinforcing the notion that you are there to work – not to chit chat or surf the net.

Photo by Hannah Harp

6. Review as you go

Even if a test isn’t on the horizon, the act of reviewing material briefly helps store that information in your long-term memory, so you’ll already have it memorized when the test day arrives. One  activity that helps some students retain information is studying with a friend and verbally reviewing the material. By talking it out, especially the concepts that are the most difficult, some students find that they remember the conversation better on the test day and even find that explaining the information to a friend solidifies their understanding of the information. Plus, you get to hear your friend’s thoughts on the concept as well. It’s a win-win!

These students contributed to tips for this story:

  • Sofya Bochkareva
  • Brittney Bringuez
  • Taylor Killefer
  • Kylie Miller

 

 

 

Five Hiking Trails within 45 Minutes of Chapman

Delving into nature by hiking offers a way to find silence and clarity. In addition to reducing stress and clearing our heads, hiking also burns calories. What’s not to like? Finding hiking trails near Chapman can be tricky, so we’ve made the search easier with these five trails under an hour away.

Each destination may contain different routes. Click on trail name to see trail maps and more information.

  1. Crystal Cove: There are multiple routes that you can choose from – all travel across a variety of terrain and allow you to admire the ocean and cliffs.
  • Maximum distance: 2.9 miles
    • Distance from Chapman: 20-30 min.
  • Time: 1-2 hours
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Elevation gain: 505 ft
  • Dogs: No
  • Parking: $15

Photos by Marissa Dunn and courtesy of California Beaches.

  1. Black Star Canyon: Frequent hikers probably know of the Black Star Canyon Trail, accessed off Highway 241 at Santiago Canyon. After a few miles you will turn left onto Silverado Canyon, then left onto Black Star Canyon Road. This trail requires crossing streams and rock scrambling.
  • Maximum distance: 6.8 miles
    • Distance from Chapman: 20-30 min.
  • Time: 4-5 hours
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Elevation gain: 941 ft
  • Dogs: Yes
  • Parking: $15

Photos courtesy of ChasingBelle.com

  1. Big Bend Loop, Laguna Coast: Offers the chance to see wildlife and is primarily used for hiking, trail running, and nature trips. The first portion is very steep, but the intense cardio is worth it for the stunning views.
  • Maximum distance: 5.8 miles
    • Distance from Chapman: 20-30 min
  • Time: 4-5 hours
  • Difficulty: Hard
  • Elevation gain: 889 ft.
  • Dogs: No
  • Parking : $3

Photo courtesy of The Outbound Collective

4. San Clemente Beach Trail: This trail extends from the Metro Station parking lot at North Beach to Calafia State Beach in the south. This is a flat, crushed granite trail that’s shared by walkers, runners, bikers, dogs and strollers. Because it’s a flat out-and-back trail, you can make it as easy or challenging as you want.

  • Maximum distance: 4.6 miles

    • Distance from Chapman: 45 min
  • Time: ~1.5 hours
  • Difficulty: Easy
  • Elevation gain: 50 ft
  • Dogs: Yes
  • Parking: Free

Photo courtesy of Jeff Hester and Go Hike it

  1. Peters Canyon Hike: Recovering from a fire last year, Peters Canyon offers a variety of trails for hikers, mountain bikers and equestrians.
  • Maximum distance: 5.9 miles
    • Distance from Chapman: 15-20 min
  • Time: 1-2 hours
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Elevation gain: 680ft
  • Dogs: Yes (on leash only)
  • Parking: Small fee

Photo courtesy of Trailing Friday  

5 Adventures To Complete Before You Graduate

Any Chapman alumni you talk to will say “those four years go by so fast.” To help cope with your impending graduation, here are five activities you should try to complete during your time at Chapman. They won’t make time slow down, but they will help you create memories that could last a lifetime.

1. Jump off the high dive

Simon Duyuygan, a sophomore Strategic Corporate Communication major, shows off a 2 ½ pike off the high dive. Photo by Marissa Dunn

Not feeling undie run this semester? Jump off the high dive instead! There are plenty of ways to access the pool, so there’s no excuse not to give this one the old college try. If you’re feeling extra risky, some people even do this activity naked.

2. Laugh until you cry at Improv!

Tom Schuyler of Improv Inc. performs in the Irvine Lecture Hall at Chapman University Monday night. Photo courtesy of Drew A. Kelley

Ever yearn to see a skit about your drunk uncle attending your chem class? Every other Thursday night at Irvine Lecture Hall, hilarious skits are put on by your fellow peers in Chapman’s Improv Inc. It’s free so there’s no reason to miss out! Stay up to date with @chapmanimprov on Instagram.

3. Use the pit by the dorm pool for a bonfire

Make sure to gather blankets, graham crackers, chocolate, marshmallows, and anything else you need for a memorable and delicious bonfire! Photo by Marissa Dunn

This activity is perfect if you don’t want to drive 15 miles to the beach and get all sandy. S’mores, guitar playing, and deep conversation can be found around the fire pit next to the Chapman dorm pool.

4. Tailgate a sporting event

Nico Martinez and his family enjoy tailgating at parents weekend. Photo courtesy of Marcella Martinez

Get into the Panther spirit by grabbing some friends and munching on burgers and snacks outside Beckman Hall before Chapman’s home football games. Alternate: pick up some rowdy friends and do a real tailgate at Hart Park before a Panther baseball game. Follow home and away games with @chapmansports on Instagram.

5. Attend Open Mics in the circle

The Ugly Mug Cafe is just a short walk from Chapman, so head over and enjoy the great atmosphere and delicious food. Photo courtesy of The Ugly Mug Cafe.

Head to the Ugly Mug Cafe for live entertainment like Open Mic Nights and Poetry Readings! For those who want to perform their own poem, sign ups are open before the event. Check out https://www.theuglycafe.com for more details.

Once you complete your activity, post a photo on social media with the tag #chapmanbucketlist and a checkmark to show you’ve completed it. As they all say, pics or it didn’t happen!

 

The 10 Stages of Parking at Chapman

Stage 1: “How did I get to campus so fast? Maybe I will have enough time to get Starbucks before class.”

Stage 2: “Oh there’s a spot… UGH stupid motorcycle!”

Stage 3: “They would add 20 reserved spots for guests….technically I am a guest right?”

 

Stage 4: “WHY do people think it is okay to drive 80 mph in a parking garage?!”

 

Stage 5: “Yes please, walk slower. I don’t have to get to class or anything.”

 

Stage 6: “YES I found one” *someone steals it*

 

Stage 7: “I’ll just wait here and stalk someone walking to their car”

 

Stage 8: “I’ve been driving in circles for 20 minutes”

 

Stage 9: “Screw it I am parking illegally”

Stage 10: “I give up, I am parking in Dodge/Narnia and walking”