10 Things That Happen When You Switch Your Major

Whether you are just starting, in the middle of it all, or nearing the cap and gown, you may have pondered the idea of completely switching gears and jumping to a different path in the map of career choices. You are not alone.

About 33 percent of students enrolled in bachelor’s degree programs will switch their major and 10 percent will change their major more than once, according to a 2017 study by the National Center for Education Statistics.

Now that you know that switching majors is no biggie, here are some things you can expect if you do end up changing career paths.

     1. You may feel a little confused, and stressed, and behind.

     2. But excited too of course! The world is now your oyster!

     3. You will feel so motivated to learn. You just let go of something that wasn’t right and freedom feels good!

     4. You may hit some stumps. Who knew learning about Communications required so much… communicating?

     5. You’ll realize that all majors require hard work, but in different forms.

     6. But if you like it, it’s not really work, right?

     7. You’ll make new friends.

     8. Don’t worry, if your old friends in your old major are real, they’ll keep in touch.

     9. You’ll think about switching majors again. It’s okay if you need to reevaluate.

     10. You’ll graduate! And maybe think about switching career paths again.

Five Panther Stereotypes You Might See On Chapman Campus

Chapman students are said to be diverse, but a big chunk come from California, Washington, Hawaii, Colorado, and Oregon, according to a report from the Chapman admissions office. If you are from one of these places, you may meet lots of others Panthers from your area. 

We found five models to help depict the top five states listed above – you might recognize each by their all too familiar stereotypes.


1) We got California hitting #1 – no surprise there.

“No I do not watch the Kardashians everyday, but at least a couple times a week,” Alyssa Steinfeld, a junior business administration major from Brea, California, said.

It may not stand out to Californians, but it is pretty common to say “OMG” or “literally” between every sentence. Of course, you aren’t a Californian unless you are well-versed in show business and avocado toast.


2) Washington rings in at #2. A large proportion of Chapman students hail from this rainy state, perhaps because students are seeking some California sun.

“To be honest, I’m such a California girl, but, of course, my roots are based in Washington-people can tell by my passion for coffee and apples. I still hate the rain though,” Emily Felix, a sophomore business major from Bellevue, Washington, said.

Vegan food and coffee are staples for Washington natives. “U-dub” is a typical nickname for the University of Washington, where many young people hang out and enjoy good restaurants and dainty coffee shops.


3) Hawaii is #3. Like California, Hawaii has a laid back and easy-going way of life.

“It’s not all ‘hang loose by the beach’ all the time. Sometimes it’s a ‘hang loose by the waterfall and hike’ type of deal,” Cassidy Keola, a junior communication studies and public relations major from Ewa Beach, Hawaii, said.

Hawaii has a second language called Pidgin. For example, using “shoots” means “Okay!” or “Let’s do it!” and GRINDZ means good food. Keola said that Hawaiian locals do basically the same things as Californians, such as shopping and eating.


4) Colorado is #4. Much like the Pacific Northwest, Colorado also is home to adventure and pizza: a match made in heaven.

“As much as I love the California sunshine, I miss the mountains and snow in my hometown. Plus, snowboarding brings back so many good childhood memories,” Wil Lowery, a junior business administration major from Lone Tree, Colorado, said.

Many Colorado natives love honey on their pizza crust. They also like to call themselves “ColoRADo” or “granola,” which means dressing hipster or having a free spirit. Oh, and they love winter sports, of course.


5) Oregon is the last most popular state – where health and outdoorsmanship become one.

“We’re just people who love being active and enjoying quality food in a quality place,” Trevor Vill, a junior health science major from Eugene, Oregon, said.

Oregon natives love their adventures and coffee, but what sets them apart from their Washingtonian counterparts is the “foodie” vibe. From fresh local food to the trendiest restaurants, Oregonians are food lovers. They also gush over their favorite grocery store, Fred Meyers, and a local coffee shop, Dutch Bros.


All photos by Jasmine Liu.