Exploring Chapman’s Hookup Culture

 

It’s 11 p.m. at a Risky Business-themed fraternity party. Two inebriated strangers make eye contact from across the room. The rest is history, until the next morning. This is the hookup culture present at Chapman University.

 

A new sociology study from Occidental College claims that a college environment normalizes hookup culture by posing a false expectation of what “fun” is supposed to be. This leads the stereotypical college experience to revolve around boosting up one-night stands, according to the study.

 

According to Lisa Wade, the associate professor of sociology at Occidental College and author of “American Hookup,” any interaction you have with a person can trigger a chemical reaction in your body. This reaction can make you crave them for better or for worse.

 

“You have casual sex at the party for the same reason you take notes or eat in the dining hall. You feel like it’s the right thing to do,” Wade said.

 

Chapman students share their experience with having one-night stands. Some turned out better than others.

 

One sophomore psychology major, who chose to remain anonymous, is no amateur when it comes to being in a relationship. When she entered Chapman she unexpectedly caught the feels for someone. Unfortunately the boy that she gave her heart to had other plans.

Photo By https://www.twenty20.com/photos/f176f3c4-73f5-4cc2-b785-fa35815e8ec9

“I didn’t know where it was going and after we had hung out for a while, I asked him what was going on between us,” she said. “He said he wasn’t looking for anything until his senior year,” said this anonymous student.

 

She didn’t just sit around and wait; according to the psychology major, women are attracted to men that they have a good time being around. They want to keep seeing them and hope to be their end game. Her experience with men has jaded her perspective of them.

 

“Guys don’t want girlfriends in college, but just want to party and get with anyone they can,” she said.

 

Things didn’t go as smoothly for another anonymous sophomore business major. The female student recalls attending her first fraternity party. What she did not expect was a one night stand.

 

“He was really down to earth and seemed genuinely interested in learning about me,” this anonymous student said. “I got too drunk and we ended up sleeping together,” she said.

 

The following day they were smitten. Pillow talk, breakfast, and a trip to the beach later, the student expected to see him again the next day. She was sorely wrong.

 

“He dropped me off at my dorm that night and that was literally the last time I saw him,” the student said.

 

According to Wade, if a one-night stand is not reciprocated by either of the individuals involved, it is not healthy. One person is not entitled to determine the rules.

 

“When we engage in these types of encounters we are starting a relationship and we are always accountable for how we make each other feel,” Wade said. “It’s our job to treat the other person as a person,” Wade said.

 

An anonymous male business major explains a time where he lead a female student on to believing that their one-night stand would progress into a relationship. At the time, this was not his intention.

 

“I feel like if I was consistently seeing this girl and then randomly decided to stop talking to her it would be different. We met once and I didn’t expect her to want anything more and I really wasn’t trying to be a typical asshole,” the student said.

 

According to the male student one-night stands are very normal in college. When one person expects more out of a tipsy hookup, the other person shouldn’t be fully penalized.

Photo by pexels.com

 

Sophomore public relations and advertising major, Hayley Wierwell says she had trouble with a  hookup-turned one-sided relationship.

 

“I was walking back to my dorm room and bumped into a guy triggering me to spill water all over myself,” Wierwell said. “He then asked for water and leaned in to kiss me and I turned me cheek and said no,” Wierwell said.

 

The next time Wierwell ran into her mystery man was at a fraternity party. Confronted for a second time by this stranger, Wierwell gave in. They exchanged numbers and ended up sleeping together. The next morning called for an awkward conversation.

 

“I looked at him and said this can only be a one time thing because I’m in love with someone else,” Wierwell said.

 

Wierwell is one of many students who have woken up to find their one night stand is not the person of their dreams, reflecting the findings of the new Occidental study.

This story has redacted the name of a student who chose to remain anonymous on May 16, 2018– the same day the story was posted. 

Chlamydia is Chapman’s most common STI

 

“Don’t get pregnant and don’t get an STD.”

An anonymous public relations and advertising major rolled her eyes as her mother said this while moving her into her freshman dorm. A year and a few drunken hookups later, the student sat in Chapman’s health center waiting to hear if she had chlamydia.

The anonymous student is not an anomaly: the most commonly-treated sexually transmitted infection for both men and women at Chapman is chlamydia, according to Director of Student Health Jacqueline Deats.

Chapman’s health center has seen 200 students for specific STI testing in the last year, according to Deats. The health center has two categories of testing: sexually transmitted infections and general gynecology. The health center has seen 516 female patients that have opted for STI testing when they visited for their general gynecology appointment in the last year, Deats said.

The anonymous female student was one of those 516.

The student found out she had Chlamydia the summer before entering her sophomore year at Chapman. After receiving the news, she said she didn’t know whether to be more concerned about treating her STI or figuring out how she got it.

“I wasn’t extremely promiscuous, but I also certainly did not have a boyfriend,” she said. “You could say I had about four boyfriends.”

Promiscuity is not so much a factor as commonality when it comes to chlamydia. There have been a reported 1.59 million cases of chlamydia in the United States since 2015, according to the Center for Disease Control.

The Center for Disease Control concluded that sexually transmitted infections occur widely among college students. Chlamydia is most common between ages 15 and 24, causing the STI to spread like wildfire on college campuses.

“I was worried I had already given it to someone else, but there was no way I would have casually texted one of the four guys I

had slept with to let them know I had chlamydia,” the student said.

Instead, she used an internet resource to tell the men they could potentially have contracted an STI.

“I found this website that let me anonymously send a text message that told each of the guys I had slept with to get tested,” she said.

The student was able to take medication from the health center to treat her STI. She said her takeaway from the experience was to take advantage of the condoms that the health center gives out for free.

Adderall-prescribed students face pressures to share

10 mg Adderall tablets. Photo by Greta Nagy

Adderall is a popular method of conquering attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder for a handful of Chapman students. Those who have a prescription hold the golden key to what many students believe enhances their ability to excel in school. Prescribed students are left with the pressure of deciding whether or not to share.

Twenty percent of unprescribed college students have used Adderall as an educational aid according to a study by the Center for Disease Control, referenced in an article by The New York Times. Students without ADHD find the effects of the amphetamine holy. With the ability to heighten attention levels and increase work ethic, unprescribed students worship the tiny pill.

Students from a psychology class taught by Dr. Sara LaBelle conducted a study about the misuse of Adderall among college students nationally. The study showed that the rate of stimulant medication misuse among college students was 17 percent. Adderall was found to be the most misused medication.

An anonymous sophomore business major has been selling Adderall as a way to make easy money since her junior year of high school. However, she is not comfortable letting people know that she has a prescription.

“I am extremely comfortable with telling people that I take Adderall,” the student said. “I don’t tell people that I’m prescribed because that way they won’t try to get the cheapest price out of me.”

The student found that when she would casually remark about having a prescription, people were more likely to argue in favor of paying less.

“I feel like I was being taken advantage of. There is a difference between being prescribed and selling, and if people know you are both, they won’t pay as much,” the student said.

A 30-day supply of Adderall. Photo by Greta Nagy

The student said she charges $10 for one 10 mg pill. The student sells them solely to get rid of extra pills.

Sophomore public relations and advertising major Anna Preblud is prescribed Adderall for a learning impediment. Preblud is hesitant to reveal that she has a prescription based off her past experiences with people taking advantage of her.

“My freshman year roommates knew that I was prescribed,” Preblud said. “When they would ask me for Adderall, I felt pressured because I knew that I would have the option to always get more.”

Preblud feels comfortable with her close friends knowing about her prescription. She draws the line there. Preblud does not give her prescription out to anyone.

“I definitely don’t tell everyone. I know that so many people would try to get close to me or ask me to have some all the time,” Preblud said.

An anonymous sophomore public relations and advertising major shares that although she is not prescribed Adderall, she has a dealer that gives her 20 mg tablets for $12 a pill.

“I found my dealer through a friend and he also goes to Chapman,” she said. “I just text him whenever I need Adderall and he gives me as much as I want as long as I pay him.”

According to another anonymous student, majoring in studio art, it is not a challenge to get Adderall from a student who is prescribed and willing to sell.

“As long as the student trusts you and you pay them, people are really casual in giving out their pills,” the student said. “I think this is personally not a smart idea, because if it really came down to it and I had to give up their name if it meant saving my education at Chapman, I would. It’s a risk were both taking.”

Freshman business major Tara Katims says having an Adderall prescription for her ADHD is immensely helpful but can also put her in unwanted situations.

“It can be a somewhat uncomfortable topic among friends. I feel pressured when they complain to me about the immense load of work they feel like they need medicine for,” Katims said.

A student’s Adderall prescription. Photo by Greta Nagy

Katims has been asked multiple times to share her medicine with fellow students, which can be awkward and stressful for her.

“I am not a pharmacist and I don’t know peoples’ medical history,” Katims said. “I don’t want to worry about the impact Adderall could have on them.”

According to Chapman professor and psychologist Dr. David Pincus, Adderall has the same effects on an individual with or without ADHD: increased focus. However, individuals without ADHD who take it put their health at risk and may experience heavy side effects.

“Stimulants allow people to have improved focus by allowing us to resist distractions that are more naturally rewarding,” Dr. Pincus said.

For people without ADHD, Adderall works as an enhancement, according to Pincus. Rather, for people without the disorder, Adderall provides a prosthetic-like device.

Pincus said, “People taking stimulants that are not prescribed are more likely to develop abuse or addiction, which can be associated with intolerance and withdrawal.”

 

City of Orange votes to oppose California’s sanctuary law

Citizens and students gather in the Civic Centre for the Orange City Council meeting. Photo by Greta Nagy

 

The city of Orange will not sue California, but will comply with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, continuing deportations despite state law.  

Orange City Council met on Tuesday to discuss joining the Trump Administration’s impending lawsuit to revoke the California Values Act, SB 54, which prohibits police from turning over suspected undocumented immigrants to agents of deportation.

The city of Orange decided not to join the lawsuit against the state of California regarding SB 54.  

Orange Mayor Mark Murphy speaks about SB 54. Photo by Greta Nagy

However, Mayor Pro Tem, Mark Murphy, and Council member Fred Whitaker, requested a rejection of bill SB 54 for the duration of the lawsuit. The entirely Republican Board of Supervisors voted and approved this motion.

Having a “custody-to-custody transfer” of an individual is a safer option than releasing them from jail in hopes that immigration enforcement authorities can deal with them, according to Whitaker.

Board of Supervisors member, Lisa Bartlett, noted that safety is a substantial concern that needs to be taken into account.

“We have to make sure that we are not providing assistance to undocumented immigrants who have chosen to not follow the rules,” Bartlett said. “We want to ensure public safety for the general public and the homeless.”

Activists protested the decision with signs and chants. Among them was Daniel Espiritu, a Chapman student and resident of Orange.

Council member Fred Whitaker argues against the sanctuary law. Photo by Greta Nagy

“I have seen families get torn about by the immigration system. We have to keep stating that no human being is illegal,” Espiritu said. “What matters most is that we are building a coalition of activists and community leaders.”

Espiritu and many others feel that there is a hold on future advancements due to the party imbalance of the Board of Supervisors.

“While I do wish the city of Orange would adopt sanctuary city status, I understand that we have to accept any progress we can gain when the majority of our City Council is Republican,” Espiritu said.

He believes the immigrant community of Orange, along with activists who stand with them, will not lose hope.

Espiritu said, “It is only through our prolonged commitment that we will achieve our goals of creating an efficient path to citizenship for our immigrant community.”

Students share memorable April Fools’ Day pranks

 

Chapman’s finest pranksters are preparing themselves for the only day of the year it is acceptable to switch out a roommate’s toothpaste for shaving cream. But according to these students’ stories, sometimes even the masterminds become the butt of an April Fools’ joke.

Sophomore business and hospitality major Chi Osse was one of the doomed students who forgot the significance of the date last year.

“I woke up alone in my dorm room,” Osse said. “I got dressed for school and went to the sink to brush my teeth. When I turned on the faucet I was blasted by a jet stream of water that soaked my entire body stomach and under.”

Photo by Greta Nagy

Osse’s roommate had taped the bottom of the faucet with electric tape so that it would malfunction. Unfortunately for his roommate, revenge was quickly served.

“I’m a huge fan of April Fools’ Day,” Osse’s roommate, sophomore real estate major Brady Ford said. “Growing up, my mom would always play the best pranks on me and my sister. I was surprised when Chi got me back.”

Osse constructed an elaborate prank to trick Ford into thinking his girlfriend was cheating with Osse. The two students set up a scene in Ford’s bed, to make it appear they had been caught in the act.

“When I walked into my dorm room after my night class I had already forgotten that it was still April Fools’ Day. I saw my girlfriend and Chi in my bed and almost punched Chi in the face, before they both yelled ‘April Fools!’” Ford said.

Sophomore communications major Tiana Vazinpoor also suffered a prank by her friends and decided to seek revenge.

“I had parked my car illegally when I was in a rush for class,” Vazinpoor said. “I returned to find no car, and a note telling me where to find my car. Immediately I called the police.”

Vazinpoor’s friends revealed that they had hidden her car as a prank, since the keys had been left in the car. Thankfully the police weren’t too hard on Vazinpoor’s quick judgement.

“I wanted to pull a prank on my friends after finding out it was them the whole time,” Vazinpoor said. “I wasn’t angry but I decided to pretend that I was furious, and told my roommate she had to move out before quickly calling ‘April Fools.’”

While many students exchange pranks with her friends, Kiana Kabir, sophomore communications major, recalls being pranked by her mother when she was 11.

“My birthday is two days after April Fools’ Day and my mom told me that my party was cancelled, took my phone, and sent me to my room,” Kabir said.

After 15 minutes of water works and confusion, Kabir’s mother burst into the room to bust the prank.

“I was so devastated that I couldn’t believe it was even a prank,” Kabir said. “I decided to pretend like I ran away from home, and instead I just ran to my neighbor’s house.”

Kabir hid in her neighbor’s basement until her mother showed up, a nervous wreck, on the verge of calling the cops. Kabir decided that they were even after that.

New photography magazine at work on third issue

Photo by Van Chung

Nostalgia, anxiety, femininity, and remembrance: these are topics that appear in the second issue of Chapman’s new LAB 140 photography magazine. The student-run magazine developed to display the photographic works of Chapman’s students and alumni has come out with two issues so far and is currently developing its spring issue. 

LAB 140 was first published in August 2017 by editor-in-chief Lia Hanson, who created the magazine. Students from all seven of Chapman’s undergraduate schools showcased their work in the opening issue. The second issue was published in February and examines deeper themes such as childhood, friendship, and loss.

“A good photo evokes a feeling in the viewer,” Hanson said. “It holds their attention and makes them ask questions. Emotion and curiosity affect someone’s taste.”

The magazine is organized into two sections: the first designated for individual photographs, and the second for a series. LAB 140’s production team begins creating their publication by meeting as a team to discuss which images they will include, and which they will turn away. They select their images through a blind review, considering the strength of the work both in subject matter and technical execution. The final stage of the review comes when the selection of works is placed on the wall to examine what will fit the flow of the issue.

Photo by Cameron Shaffer

“We put all of the photos on the wall and see what sort of works together,” creative director Tia Ruszkowska said. “We are looking for more than just landscape photography. We want to see more new creative ideas.”

The team strives to construct each issue around photography of diverse genres. Composition, coloring, focus, and lighting are all technical aspects that are evaluated during the photo admission process.

“We have a mix of instincts and personal tastes that allows us to avoid falling into one style,” Hanson said.

The magazine emphasizes photography that tells a story. Each image submitted comes with an artist statement.

“A good photo stands out either by the way it is shot — something is unique and visually interesting about it, or by the statement that comes along with it,” Ruszkowska said. “A concept behind an idea stands out right away to us.”

The magazine team says they focus on photographs that tell a story to give the visual elements more power.

Photo by Eli Weiss

Eli Weiss, a student photographer featured in LAB 140’s second issue, says that he first was introduced to the magazine through a friend who submitted their work to the first issue.

“When I heard they were taking submissions for photos, I decided I’d give it a shot,” Weiss said.

After being featured in the magazine, Weiss’ photos claimed more popularity around campus.

“One person that I didn’t know came up to me on campus and told me they liked my photos,” Weiss said.

Why didn’t some submissions make the cut for the second issue? Images that are not chosen may not fit the theme or series of that particular issue. The artist is welcome to re-submit their work at a later opportunity and will be considered for a separate issue.

“The admission process behind each photograph is very accommodating to the artists who submit them inside or outside of the art department,” Ruszkowska said.

The first issue, of the two so far, included a photo from each person who submitted something. With their second issue, the magazine opted for a more selective process.

“We chose the more interesting ones, composition, and color-wise, and you can tell when a photo stands out from others,” Ruszkowska said. “We always try to give more of a reason to say ‘yes’ than ‘no.’”

Although not everyone can be included in the issue, the team reaches out and encourages those who didn’t “make the cut” to try again. LAB 140 aspires to be a positive space for creating powerful photography, according to the magazine staff.

“I think making work is the way to make better work,” Hanson said. “It takes time and failure and a lot of ‘bad’ work to start making stuff that you’re proud of.”

 

April Fools’ Day pranks gone wrong

Courtesy of: https://www.twenty20.com/photos/62feca2c-7abf-4dff-b2f8-b5bb42d57f61

Chapman’s finest pranksters are preparing themselves for the only day of the year it is acceptable to switch out a roommate’s tooth paste for shaving cream. But according to these student stories, it is well advised to think of the consequences of April Fools’ day pranks.

Some people don’t take kindly to being made the butt of the joke. When revenge is a motivator, retaliation can be severe. Revenge pranks restore the power balance of a relationship, causing pranks to escalate beyond anyone’s imagination.

Sophomore business and hospitality major Chi Osse was one of the doomed students who forgot the significance of the date last year.

“I woke up alone in my dorm room,” Osse said. “I got dressed for school and went to the sink to brush my teeth. When I turned on the faucet I was blasted by a jet stream of water that soaked my entire body stomach and under.”

Osse’s roommate had taped the bottom of the faucet with electric tape so that it would malfunction. Unfortunately for his roommate, revenge was quickly served.

“I’m a huge fan of April Fools’ day,” Osse’s roommate, sophomore real estate major Brady Ford said. “Growing up, my mom would always play the best pranks on my sister and I. I was surprised when Chi got me back.”

Osse constructed an elaborate prank to trick Ford into thinking his girlfriend was cheating with Osse. The two students set up a scene in Ford’s bed, to make it appear they had been caught in the act.

“When I walked into my dorm room after my night class I had already forgotten that it was still April Fools’ day. I saw my girlfriend and Chi in my bed and almost punched Chi in the face, before they both yelled ‘April Fools!’” Ford said.

Photo by Greta Nagy

Sophomore communications major Tiana Vazinpoor also suffered a prank by her friends and decided to seek revenge.

“I had parked my car illegally when I was in a rush for class,” Vazinpoor said. “I returned to find no car, and a note telling me where to find my car. Immediately I called the police.”

Vazinpoor’s friends revealed that they had hidden her car as a prank, since the keys had been left in the car. Thankfully the police weren’t too hard on Vazinpoor’s quick judgement.

“I wanted to pull a prank on my friends after finding out it was them the whole time,” Vazinpoor said. “I wasn’t angry but I decided to pretend that I was furious, and told my roommate she had to move out before quickly calling ‘April Fools.’”

Offices, television shows, and radio stations are all infamous for the pranks they play on April Fools’ day. By far one of the more hit or miss categories is family: you don’t know who you could upset.

Photo courtesy: https://www.pexels.com/photo/food-person-happy-smoke-137485/

Kiana Kabir, sophomore communications major, was pranked by her mother on her eleventh April Fools’ day.

“My birthday is two days after April Fools’ day and my mom told me that my party was cancelled, took my phone, and sent me to my room,” Kabir said.

After fifteen minutes of water works and confusion, Kabir’s mother burst into the room to bust the prank.

“I was so devastated that I couldn’t believe it was even a prank!” Kabir said. “I decided to pretend like I ran away from home, and instead I just ran to my neighbors house.”

Kabir hid in her neighbor’s basement until her mother showed up, a nervous wreck, on the verge of calling the cops. Kabir decided that they were even after that.

Learn from these stories of pranks turned revenge at Chapman.  Before you switch out the sugar for salt, make sure you aren’t turned into a prank yourself.

 

 

What’s Lost Can Be Found

Photo by Greta Nagy

Once your five thousand dollar Rolex watch has been lying around in the lost and found for over ninety days, it will be donated to a charity with no further questions asked. One might think that their item was stolen when in reality it was waiting to be picked up at the lost and found.

Randy Burba, the head of Public Safety said student belongings that are unclaimed by the end of the semester are turned over to a charity. Electronic objects, such as cell phones or iPads are turned over to Chapman’s IS&T office and all the information is erased before they are sent off to a charity.

Casa Teresa, The Friendly Center and Mary’s Kitchen are some of the charities the items are donated to,” Burba said. Since January, eighty misplaced objects wait patiently to be claimed, some of them being on the pricier side.

“Occasionally laptops, phones, and cameras are turned in; those would be probably the most expensive items,” Burba said. Some very expensive smoking pipes have been turned in as well.”

Burba said each year Chapman’s lost and found accumulates hundreds of items per semester and the most common ones are everyday necessities.

“Sweatshirts, water bottles, flash drives, keys, and sunglasses are probably the most common items,” Burba said.

Burba estimated two hundred items were turned into the lost and found this past semester and already eighty have been brought in since the beginning of January.  

Associate professor of Sociology, Dr. Paul Apodaca said he speculates the reason why so many items are unaccounted for is that it’s an indication that students’ are very materialistic since there are so many things lost in the first place.

“Value equals wealth, so this is an indication of a wealthy culture that is materialistically oriented and has little fear of not being able to replace what has been lost,” said Apodaca.

On the contrary, Apodaca compares Chapman to a University with less of an abundant lost and found.

“This may be an indication of students’ that are less materialistic, as there are fewer things to be left behind. It may show a greater value for fewer things,” Apodaca said.

Burba said the lost and found is advertised through Chapman’s website and can be found in the Public Safety office and individuals usually don’t check the lost and found, thus, suffering at the cost of their lost item being given up.

Lydia Mckee, sophomore studio arts major, said she found the lost and found especially helpful when she lost something valuable to her.

“I was on campus late last semester and after my last class, I was excited to get back home. I forgot my water bottle in my art classroom and I was so upset because it was a swell bottle that I just bought. I went to the lost and found, described it to them, and was able to get it back,” Mckee said.

Photo by Greta Nagy

Burba said the lost and found policy permits students’ from entering the area where the items are stored. We’d love to give you more details about the contents of the lost and found but Public Safety prevents us from getting a gander at the actual items. Individuals are not able to claim an item from the lost and found without describing it. Every item is logged in with a specific tag number and the object’s final disposition is tracked.

“The system is run very professionally. Every effort to contact the owner is made in an attempt to get their property back to them,” Burba said.

Chapman and the Public Safety office, do not provide a campus-wide email or alert reminding students’ to come claim their lost items,” Burba said.

Photo by Greta Nagy

“I am all for a method that might get more items back to their owner, I am just not sure an email system is the answer,” said Burba. “People are overrun with emails as it is, and inundating everybody with emails would probably be more annoying to most than helpful,” Burba said.

Although Burba thinks sending emails would do more harm than good, Mckee believes alerting students’ of items in the lost and found through a recurring schoolwide email, more items would be returned to their rightful owners.

“If it’s an item of a certain amount of value I think the student deserves the chance to get it back because they might not even know its in there,” Mcgee said.

Randy Burba said the percentage of people who actually lose things is quite minuscule compared to the larger student population. Unfortunately, not all the items are returned to their rightful owners.

“We make every effort to get items back but sometimes we have no way of knowing who they belong to. I would prefer that everything got returned to the original owner but that is not always possible,” Burba said.

Chapman’s Most Unheard of Majors That Need Attention

Consisting of ten schools and colleges that specialize in catering to each individual’s desired educational path, Chapman provides its students with a diverse genre of majors. The following seven majors are among some of the most unique to Chapman and provide students with a wide range of post-graduation opportunities.

1. Animators Unite!

Who isn’t an avid fan of Frozen, The Jungle Book, or any popular Disney film? It’s hard not to want to take advantage of such an eccentric major. Students who study animation at Chapman will graduate on a path to becoming editors, animators, or texture painters. With state of the art equipment allowing students to design 2D or even 3D images and videos, your artistic skills will easily accentuate. Students will study motion, color, and story structure, combined with visual effects. Part of the Dodge School of Film and Media, this particular major stands out as one of the more obscure of its bunch, but don’t let the ambiguity hold you back from following your dreams of becoming the next Don Hahn! 

2. House Hunters

Business Administration, a popular major within Chapman’s Argyros School of Business and Economics, is full of the most typical majors for those pursuing a career as a financial advisor, company manager, or even a self-made business entrepreneur. What many are searching for, is the pathway to an affluent career in real estate. Sherina Mahtani, a sophomore real estate emphasis major, explains her experience with the program: “I have always known I wanted to get into real estate after living in New York City with beautiful buildings and hotels around me. I started my freshman year with a management emphasis because I wasn’t sure there even was a specific program for real estate. It’s been really great and inspiring.”  Students will take classes in marketing, finance, and business economics, to eventually find opportunities at large organizations and firms upon graduation.

 

3. Real-igion

Religion, if you were wondering, is a real major here at Chapman. Chapman’s Wilkinson college provides an incredibly concealed major that is ideal for providing students with the skill set needed to become a minister, teacher, lawyer, or even journalist: a major in religious studies. Courses that are required include: philosophy, theology, and ethics. The knowledge of religion embellishes an individuals understanding of history, politics, and culture. All of those years in Sunday school may finally come into handy! Take advantage of a truly heart opening major that will not only better yourself but your aspiring profession.

4. Choose Your Own Adventure…

Did you ever think you could major in creating stories? Fiction, adventure, romance, thriller, horror… you could be the one to create the next Harry Potter equivalent series. Creative writing is something many wouldn’t believe you could even major in, because it is such an enjoyable activity. Who doesn’t love getting wrapped up in a fabulous novel or keeping a journal? With this major, you can turn your most imaginative ideas into a reality. Individuals are put to hard work by taking comprehensive writing classes, participating in lectures, and contributing to workshop classes that will train and advance their writing skills. Students are able to explore many genres to finally help mold a structured template for their future writing endeavors.

5. Spin the Wheel 

By receiving a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Art, you have the option to choose among painting, drawing, photography, and even sculpture. Many art majors take advantage of Chapman’s awe-inspiring studio-arts program to go on to become an artist, gallery owners, or art directors. Only a small percentage of students can tolerate the chalky feeling of dried clay, but those are the ones who appreciate a major in ceramics the most. Ceramics is an unheard of major since most are unaware that it is even offered. Freshman Helen Ogara, a fine arts major who is aspiring to make ceramics into a career. Helen speaks about her experience with the program and what it has taught her: “Ceramics is my escape. I am so grateful that I found a major that fulfills not only my artistic needs but my personal happiness.” Students take beginning level, intermediate, and advanced ceramics classes and work on building a portfolio that can be shown to future employers.

6. Teachers Pet

The Attallah College of Educational Studies offers a combined five-year bachelors program, called The MACI Program, for students who want to pursue education. Maggie Gallardo, a junior IES major, is coming to the end of her first semester in the MACI Program and shared her experience so far: “The classes are student-centered and the professors challenge me to think critically about teaching methods.” 

7. Bonjour!

Four years of a language? Four years of learning about another culture? Traveling to a foreign country for a semester? A French major, or any other language for that matter, offers an exclusive educational opportunity. Hannah Hutson, a sophomore double french and international business major, speaks on her experience as a French major: “I like French as a major because it shows how I’m able to think critically in another language and how I can interpret other cultures.” Some perks of this major are the classes offered and the study abroad opportunities. Hannah speaks about one of her favorite classes: “I took a class called french cooking where we made food and presented it to the class and then got to eat it after!”