Breaking Down the Movie Loyalty Programs for Theaters Close to Chapman

Movie tickets can be extremely expensive these days, especially if you’re a broke college student. Thankfully, many theaters and ticketing companies provide various loyalty programs for movie-goers to save on some cash and not to miss out on any of the biggest new releases. Here are five different loyalty programs that work at all the movie theaters within a five-mile radius of Chapman along with some pros and cons of being a member.

 

AMC A-List

AMC A-List may have be the most expensive loyalty program on this list, but it’s packed with benefits! Graphic by Ethan Williams.

Pros:

  • You’re able to see at most 12 movies a month for $20, which is quite the deal!
  • You’re able to see films in the IMAX and Dolby theaters for the same price as you would pay for any a 2D movie
  • Shorter lines at the concession stand
  • You’re able to reserve your seats online
  • You get a free large popcorn and drink on your birthday!

Cons:

  • Dropping $20 a month can be quite spendy depending on your financial situation
  • It’s only valid at one theater near Chapman

Atom Rewards

When using the Atom Tickets app, you’re able to purchase and have access to your tickets through your phone. Graphic by Ethan Williams.

Pros:

  • The program allows you to link other memberships like AMC A-List to your account, giving you the ability to use your three free movies a week from A-List to count towards a fourth free movie on Atom Rewards
  • The program is not subscription-based, so there’s no pressure to get your money’s worth

Cons:

  • You still have to pay for three movie tickets at regular price if you want the fourth ticket free
  • Like AMC A-List, it’s only valid at one theater near Chapman

Cinemark Movie Club

While Cinemark Movie Club may only provide one free ticket a month, it is the cheapest subscription-based loyalty program on this list. Graphic by Ethan Williams.

Pros:

  • $8.99 a month is less than one average movie ticket in Southern California
  • Discounts on expensive concessions definitely come in handy
  • The Century Stadium 25 is the closest theater to Chapman

Cons:

  • Again, this program is only valid at one theater near Chapman
  • You still have to pay extra for premium screening like the XD Theater

Fandango VIP Plus

Much like the Atom Tickets, Fandango allows you to purchase movie tickets through your phone. But this time it can be used for more movie theaters! Graphic by Ethan Williams.

Pros:

  • If you link your Atom Rewards account to AMC A-list, you can use your three free movies a week can count towards a fourth free movie
  • The program is not subscription-based, so there’s no pressure to get your money’s worth
  • It works at multiple theaters near Chapman

Cons:

  • You still have to pay for movie tickets at regular price in order to get discounts and rewards
  • There’s a service charge for buying tickets through Fandango
  • You have to see a lot of movies to in order to gain enough points for some serious discounts

 

MoviePass

MoviePass has had a rough past year in terms of making a profit and its customer service. If you’re considering to finally get a MoviePass, proceed with caution. Graphic by Ethan Williams.

Pros:

  • MoviePass can be used at the most theaters out of all the loyalty programs on this list
  • Three movies a month for around $10 is less than one average movie ticket in Southern California

Cons:

  • You’re only able to watch a select group of films that changes from day to day
  • Due to poor management from the company, the app rarely works these days, restricting you from getting a ticket
  • MoviePass has notoriously bad customer service

 

Overall, if you’re an avid movie fan, AMC A-List is definitely the biggest bang for your buck. If you’re a bit more casual and only tend to see only one film a month, Cinemark Movie Club may be your best option. Atom Rewards and Fandango VIP Plus may not be the best option alone if you want to watch movies for cheap, but they do come in handy when linked to other loyalty programs like AMC A-List. As for Moviepass, recent announcements from the company have revealed changes to their structure, including newer payment tiers that allows subscribers access to more free movies per month. Since these changes won’t be put into effect until January 2019, it’s hard to determine whether this will actually save MoviePass from its poor customer service or dysfunctioning app, but it does look promising.

15 Fantastic Films You Can Find at the Leatherby Libraries

Many students may not know this, but deep within the shelves on the third floor of the Leatherby Libraries is home to a true gold mine of movies. Here’s a list of 15 films worth checking out that you can’t find on services like Netflix or Hulu, but can easily access through our school library.

2001: A Space Odyssey

Starting off with Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, it can be a hard sell to any casual movie watcher. It’s three hours long and might not have the same high energy as the countless other science fiction films it inspired. That being said, 2001 is the equivalent to “cinematic vegetables” for any film lover- it’s sort of a required viewing. If you ever have three hours free on a weekend, find the biggest screen you can and prepare to go on a journey unlike any other with this cinematic masterpiece.

The Big Lebowski

The Leatherby Libraries is home to many Coen brothers films worth watching, but one stands out from the rest as their best work yet. The Big Lebowski is one of those rare films that gets better and better upon each rewatch. Weren’t a fan the first time? Give it another shot, and if you have never seen the film before, college is the perfect time to be introduced to Jeff Bridge’s career defining role as the Dude.

Big Trouble in Little China

A vastly underrated cult classic from the mind behind Halloween and The Thing, John Carpenter’s Big Trouble in Little China is an absolute blast to watch. Taking inspiration from the great kung-fu Chinese blockbusters, Big Trouble in Little China centers around the iconic Jack Burton (Kurt Russell) as he slings one-liners and “shakes the pillars of heaven” in Chinatown, San Francisco. The film is not all spectacle and captivating fight choreography, though. Carpenter presents a satirical yet thoughtful commentary on the ‘white savior’ protagonist that plagued, and arguably still plagues, films like these, which makes the film all the more enjoyable.

Creed

Before director Ryan Coogler dominated pop culture with the hit Black Panther, he directed one of the greatest installments in the Rocky saga: Creed. Better bring some tissues to this one, because Creed will make you cry, but it will also make you cheer. Got an exam or a project coming up that you don’t feel confident about? Watch this film and you’ll be ready to take on the world! It’d also be appropriate to watch this film before the Adonis Creed returns to the ring this Thanksgiving in Creed II.

Detour

When discussing great noir films, Edgar G. Ulmer’s Detour isn’t brought up as much as it should be. A nightclub pianist hitchhikes his way from New York to Los Angeles. One day, he accepts a ride from a gambler when the driver unexpectedly dies. From beginning to end, Detour is boiling with enough tension and suspense to keep you engaged. The film is a tight 67 minutes, so it never bores you by drawing out the mystery.

Dracula

Halloween is just around the corner, so why not celebrate by watching something old school… really old school. Tod Browning’s Dracula is one of the few of Universal’s early monster movies that still hold up today thanks to its eerie tone and its excess of gothic aesthetics. This film shaped the image of Count Dracula in pop culture today, so it’s a must watch for any vampire fanatic!

Godzilla (Gojira)

Everyone knows the king of the monsters, but not many have experienced his very first foray on Tokyo. Ishirô Honda’s 1954 classic is a unique film that can be both entertaining to watch with friends. You can have fun watching a dude in a rubber suit kick through a miniature city, or it can be viewed as the film being an allegory of the nuclear bombs being dropped in Japan, which makes the experience a whole lot deeper.

Howard the Duck

The Leatherby Libraries may offer some of the greatest films to ever hit the silver screen, but it also contains a few of its worst. Why would anyone recommend the George Lucas (yes, that’s right, that George Lucas) produced Howard the Duck then, you may ask? Well, Howard the Duck is a special case where the film goes through so many levels of horrible, it’s actually quite entertaining to watch. It’s really telling that the director Willard Huyck has never directed a film since Howard the Duck. He knew he could never top this. Grab some friends and make a night of of this film by questioning how something like this could’ve been made.

Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

Listen, a Wes Anderson film was bound to make it onto this list. Out of all of Anderson’s films in the library, Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou is one worth checking out, not only because it’s one of his best, but also because it works as a great introduction to Wes Anderson style. Anderson’s stylization in an aquatic setting along with the heart and humor from its large cast of characters leads to really charming film. Bill Murray gives one of his best performances as Steve Zissou, who’s essentially Jacques Cousteau, but a lot more emotionally messed up. If this film doesn’t make you want to explore and celebrate life, then who knows what will.

Lost in Translation

That’s right, back to back Bill Murray. Life Aquatic was one of Bill Murray’s best performances, but Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation takes the cake as Bill Murray’s greatest yet. Sofia Coppola paints such an atmospheric picture of Tokyo in this film, which really makes the city a character of its own. How can a city so busy have so much loneliness? How can a relationship so subtle and underplayed feel so romantic? The film may be too methodically paced for some, but if you’re willing to be patient with it, Lost in Translation will reveal its beauty.

The Master

If there’s one word to describe Paul Thomas Anderson’s The Master, it’s hypnotic. While the film doesn’t name drop the cult itself, it’s about Scientology. This film is in no way in support of the church, but more of character study and a twisted deconstruction of the human consciousness and the desire to be the greatest one can be. Joaquin Phoenix is at his all time best in this film. If you want to get a glimpse of the levels of madness he can reach before you watch his performance as the Joker next year, you should definitely give this film a watch. Or if you like strange yet thought provoking movies, then this will be right up your alley.

Mon Oncle

Jacques Tati’s Mon Oncle is just a delight, there’s nothing else to it. Don’t let the fact that it’s a French film scare you away, because there’s very little dialogue. It spends more time letting the viewer have fun with the eccentric characters and physical gags than reading the subtitles. The film is simple yet imaginative, and so wholesome in its comedy. If rainy days ever existed in Southern California, then this film would be a perfect watch during one.

Planet of the Apes

A landmark in science fiction cinema, Franklin J. Schaffner’s Planet of the Apes presents the ultimate “what if” and is the perfect film to watch or revisit in a post Black Mirror culture. While there are some cheesy scenes, the film presents an impressive commentary on the relationship between religion and politics. It deconstructs the power of organized religion and the patriarchy in society and  it can lead to ignorance of those who refuse to see, hear, or speak the truth. Pretty clever, huh? Bet you didn’t think you’d get that out of a movie with a bunch of gorillas riding horses!

Singin’ in the Rain

Everyone knows this one, but Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly’s Singin’ in the Rain had to be included purely because, as shocking as it is, it’s nowhere to be found on any prominent streaming service! Thankfully the Leatherby Libraries have you covered when it comes to the best musicals. What hasn’t been said about this film? The music is so catchy and timeless, and the choreography is spellbinding. If you haven’t seen this classic yet, head to the library as soon as you can to check it out!

Yojimbo

Almost everything you’ve seen in popular cinema has been inspired by Akira Kurosawa. He’s one of the most influential directors when it comes to telling a grand story. All of Kurosawa’s samurai films are worth checking out. Luckily, the Leatherby Libraries owns his entire filmography. Yojimbo is the perfect first step into his feudal Japan epics. Yojimbo is not nearly as long as some of his other films, but it still carries the same amount of style and gravitas. If you’ve seen any western out of the 1960s and 70s, or even films like Star Wars, you’ll notice various aspects come from films like Yojimbo.

Still not sold? No worries, these are just a handful of the amazing films you can easily get access to at the Leatherby Libraries! If you ever have some time on your hands, explore all that they have to offer and you may just find a cinematic gem of your own. Have fun watching!

ChapCRIBZ: Episode One

The school year has begun and Chapman students are in the process of putting together together their new rental homes. Follow three students, the self proclaimed “Bravi Boys”, on a tour of their home, the famed “Snet House”, for tips and tricks on how to put together the perfect Chapman living space.